Fans get green light to attend AIG Women’s Open at Carnoustie

Up to 8,000 fans per day can attend the AIG Women’s Open at Carnoustie the week after next, the R&A has confirmed, following support from the Scottish Government as part of its Events Gateway Process.

Germany's Sophia Popov won last year's AIG Women's Open, which was played behind closed doors at Royal Troon. Picture: R&A
Germany's Sophia Popov won last year's AIG Women's Open, which was played behind closed doors at Royal Troon. Picture: R&A

Last year’s event at Royal Troon, where Germany’s Sophia Popov pulled off a fairytale victory, was played behind closed doors, as will be the case with next week’s Trust Golf Women’s Scottish Open at Dumbarnie Links in Fife.

But, on the back of 32,000 spectators per day being in attendance at the men’s Open at Royal St George’s in Kent last month, the R&A has now received the green light for fans to be at Carnoustie as well for the season’s final major.

Martin Slumbers, Chief Executive of the R&A said: “We and our partners at AIG were incredibly proud of what we achieved for women’s golf at the AIG Women’s Open last year, and we will always remember Sophia Popov’s outstanding victory, but in 2021 fans are what will elevate the AIG Women’s Open from memorable to truly special.

“Fans are so important to major sporting championships; they create atmosphere, they celebrate greatness and commiserate heartbreak, they bring passion and excitement. We are truly delighted to welcome spectators back to the AIG Women’s Open at Carnoustie.”

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The R&A, working closely with the Scottish and UK governments, its health and safety advisers and local health authorities, has implemented health protocols to ensure the safety of the players, officials, fans and local Angus community.

These include everyone attending the event being strongly encouraged to be double vaccinated and also to undertake twice weekly lateral flow tests.

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Slumbers added: “A successful and a safe championship has been the R&A and AIG’s top priority throughout the planning process for the AIG Women’s Open.

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“We have a duty of care, as best we can, to mitigate the risk Covid-19 to those attending the Championship and importantly not to impose any greater risk to our hosts in the local Angus area.

“Our protocols follow the best practice guidance for staging a major event during the pandemic and have been formed with the support of and in close consultation with the Scottish government and The R&A’s medical and health & safety advisors.”

Fans wishing to attend should book their tickets in advance at aigwomensopen.com. Adult tickets start from £25 with children aged 16 years or under before the Championship admitted free of charge. Spectators aged 24 years or under will be entitled to purchase youth (16-24 years) tickets starting from £12.50.

Minister for Culture, Europe and International Development Jenny Gilruth said: “I am very pleased that the Scottish Government’s process for supporting flagship events has helped enable the return of spectators to the AIG Women’s Open.

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“I know how challenging Covid has been for the events sector and I commend the hard work and dedication of all those involved in the event, including the R&A, their health and safety experts and a range of local delivery partners for the exceptional protocols and mitigations in place that allow us collectively to proceed with the event with confidence.

“I have no doubt that the spectators in attendance at the AIG Women’s Open will enjoy the world-class sport that unfolds on the Angus coast and enhance the event.”

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