Labour MEP shifts position on indyref2 after Brexit vote

A senior Labour MEP has said he has no idea how he would vote if Nicola Sturgeon succeeds in holding a second Scottish independence referendum.
A senior Labour MEP's has changed his views on independence the wake of the UK's EU referendum, in which Scots voted to remain. Picture: Getty ImagesA senior Labour MEP's has changed his views on independence the wake of the UK's EU referendum, in which Scots voted to remain. Picture: Getty Images
A senior Labour MEP's has changed his views on independence the wake of the UK's EU referendum, in which Scots voted to remain. Picture: Getty Images

David Martin, who is the UK’s longest serving MEP and the second longest serving MEP in the European Parliament, said his stance has shifted in the wake of the Brexit vote.

He said he voted for Scotland to stay in the UK in 2014, but the decision to leave the EU has left “a whole lot of questions that have yet to be answered”.

Read More
Watch Nicola Sturgeon tell US that Scots ready for indyref2
David Martin is the UKs longest serving MEP. Picture: EUDavid Martin is the UKs longest serving MEP. Picture: EU
David Martin is the UKs longest serving MEP. Picture: EU
Hide Ad
Hide Ad

Mr Martin, who has been an MEP since 1984, told BBC Radio Scotland’s Good Morning Scotland programme: “I voted for two unions: I voted to remain in the United Kingdom, I voted to remain in the European Union - that choice has been removed from me.”

The First Minister has insisted that in the wake of the Brexit vote, Scots should be given a fresh choice on independence.

She wants such a vote to take place between autumn 2018 and spring 2019, when the terms of Brexit are clear.

David Martin is the UKs longest serving MEP. Picture: EUDavid Martin is the UKs longest serving MEP. Picture: EU
David Martin is the UKs longest serving MEP. Picture: EU

However her calls have been rebuffed by the UK Government, with Theresa May insisting “now is not the time” for another vote on Scotland’s constitutional future.

When asked how he will vote if a second referendum is held, Mr Martin said: “In truth I have no idea at the moment, there are too many factors to weigh up.”

Pressed on whether he is now open to voting for independence, he added: “The very fact that I can’t give you a straight answer indicates that I have moved. If you had asked me that question 18 months ago it would be a definitive that I would vote to remain in the United Kingdom.

“Now I think Brexit has put up a whole lot of questions that have yet to be answered.”