Testicular Cancer: Hibs FC become first Scottish leagues to pledge to perform regular testicular cancer self checks

Hibernian FC has vowed to raise awareness of testicular cancer this season with a new high-profile campaign.

Joining forces with cancer charity Cahonas Scotland, the club pledged to encourage every male player and supporter to perform regular self checks.

Testicular cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in young men in the UK, but if detected in its early stages, it is highly curable.

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To launch the partnership, stars Martin Boyle, Lewis Stevenson and Kevin Dabrowski took a break from training, donned Cahonas Scotland t-shirts, and issued a plea to supporters to check themselves regularly.

“I always look out for my teammates, that’s why I’ll be reminding them to check their balls regularly!” Stevenson said.

“Hopefully other clubs will look at this partnership and join Hibs in encouraging all their male players and supporters to check their balls.

“If this can help even one family avoid tragedy, it will be a far greater achievement than anything we could ever do on the pitch."

“I’m extremely proud to be part of a campaign which could change lives by helping to raise awareness of testicular cancer to men in Scotland.”

To launch the partnership, stars Martin Boyle, Lewis Stevenson and Kevin Dabrowski took a break from training, donned Cahonas Scotland t-shirts, and issued a plea to supporters to check themselves regularly.

As part of the club’s partnership with male-grooming brand Manscaped, Hibs will launch a series of initiatives through the season to make sure their players and supporters are doing everything they can to lessen the devastating effects of testicular cancer, including advertising at Easter Road and educational content with players and club media officials.

In 2018, former Hibs manager Alan Stubbs admitted his testicular cancer diagnosis turned his world “upside down.”

The former Celtic centre half was told he had the disease in 1998 aged 28 and underwent surgery in 2001 when further tests revealed a tumour at the base of his spine.

He added: “I feel like the luckiest guy in the world as my cancer was found early and I was able to access treatments and care that help me beat it.

He told The Scotsman: “I feel like the luckiest guy in the world as my cancer was found early and I was able to access treatments and care that help me beat it.”

Cahonas chief executive Ritchie Marshall, a testicular cancer awareness activist for more than 20 years, believes the partnership could go a long way to reducing the stigma around male anatomy.

He said: “Football is such a huge part of life in Scotland, and footballers are hugely influential – they’re role models to so many young adults.

“The support of Hibs will help us on our mission to make sure every man in Scotland self checks regularly. When people know how their balls look and feel normally, detecting changes is easy, and early detection is the best defence against the disease.

“Testicular cancer can have devastating effects for men and their families. With Hibs’ help, we can make sure that more people in Scotland can avoid tragedy.”

For a guide on how to check for testicular cancer, or for more information on how to join, support or donate to the charity visit www.cahonasscotland.org

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