Queen's funeral: Quotes of the day from Archbishop of Canterbury to members of public as nation pays tribute

Members of the public, armed forces and others have been paying tribute to Her Majesty The Queen on the day of her state funeral.

We take a look at some of the tributes and quotes from those who have paid their respects to the monarch.

“In loving and devoted memory. Charles R” – A card in the flowers on top of the Queen’s coffin.

“The grief of this day, felt not only by the late Queen’s family but all round the nation, Commonwealth and world, arises from her abundant life and loving service, now gone from us. She was joyful, present to so many, touching a multitude of lives” – The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, during the Queen’s state funeral at Westminster Abbey.

Members of the public reacts as the State Gun Carriage carries the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped in the Royal Standard with the Imperial State Crown and the Sovereign's orb and sceptre, in the Ceremonial Procession following her State Funeral at Westminster Abbey, London. Picture date: Monday September 19, 2022.

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Olena Zelenska, the first lady of Ukraine said the Queen’s attention to Ukraine “was an important signal of support” writing “She wished us better times and shared our desire for freedom. We will always remember it with deep gratitude.”

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35 pictures of the Queen's coffin procession to Wellington Arch as public say fi...

“Those who serve will be loved and remembered longer than those who cling to power and privilege are long forgotten” – Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby

“I was the last person to pay my respects to the Queen and it felt like a real privilege to do that” – Chrissy Heerey, a member of the Royal Air Force, who was the final member of the public to file past the Queen during her lying in state in Westminster Hall.

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“It’s been a bit of a difficult thing being on crutches and all that, but you couldn’t stop turning up to these kind of things. The royal family themselves have been through difficult times as well and the Queen’s always turned up and always put on a brave face. So, the least I could do is bear my problems, as little as they are in comparison” – Gwilym Jones, 39, an accountant from Queen’s Park, London, who went to watch the Queen’s funeral despite being on crutches.

“It’s hard to explain, but the Queen is someone special. We will never have a monarch like the Queen, although King Charles will do a good job. Nobody will do the job like Her Majesty the Queen did. She was a one-off, you will never get that person again.” – Jeff Hughes, a former chief chef on the Royal Yacht Britannia who travelled from Wrexham to be in Edinburgh.

“It’s an opportunity to gather because some people would feel quite isolated and alone in their own homes. To come together and be part of something bigger – we wanted to give people an opportunity to be part of that” – Reverend Richard McIlhatton, of Christ Church Presbyterian Church in Dundonald on the outskirts of Belfast, which showed the funeral on a big screen for members of its congregation.

“I think as I’ve got older I’ve realised the significance of the self-sacrifice she has given to the country and just wanted to acknowledge that and also be a part of the event” – Alison Parr, 56, from Sale, Greater Manchester, who watched the funeral at Manchester Cathedral.

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“I’m not sad, this is just a celebration of the Queen and everything she’s done. I just feel proud” – Stanley Matthews, 56, who watched proceedings on a big screen in Manchester.

“It was extremely spiritual. I know it might sound silly, but I felt that she was there, her presence. She was smiling and probably making a joke, because she liked her jokes. I think she was happy. Making a joke, saying what’s all this fuss you know, but that’s just her she had such a great sense of humour” – Sima Mansouri, the second to last parson to see the Queen lying in state in Westminster Hall.

"“It kinda brought it home. I know we don’t know The Queen, but she’s been our head of state for 70 years, you feel as though you know her, you feel as though she’s part of the family. It is kind of moving.” Mark Elliott, a 53-year-old accountant who travelled from the Lake District.