Ever told someone to shut their 'gob' because they overestimated their gift of the 'gab'? This reportedly comes from "gob" which in Gaelic means "beak", so if you said "shut your gob, hen" then it checks out etymologically.

Scottish Gaelic you already speak: 12 English words derived from Gaelic that we still use today

As most Scots are not Gaelic-speaking, they may think the language is completely detached from their lexicon, but it turns out many everyday English words are derived from Gaelic.

These words that Scotland still uses to this day, while not quite pronounced the same way, come directly from Gaelic (or from Irish Gaelic, which is closely related to Scottish Gaelic.)

It is easy to suspect Gaelic actually borrows from English, which in some cases is true as most modern European languages have adapted English words, but this overlooks how English borrows a lot from others.

Germanic, Latin, Greek, Norman French and some Celtic languages make appearances in what we know as English today.

By way of Ireland, Gaelic was brought to Scotland in the 10th century - meaning all of these words have Irish roots in common but certainly passed through Scottish Gaelic.

Learn about these words with Carl’s Lingo Kingdom (see above) from the US, or continue reading now for 12 English words that are derived from Gaelic

Germanic, Latin, Greek, Norman French and some Celtic languages make appearances in what we know as English today.

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