Asco offshoot secures North Sea decommissioning contracts worth more than £10 million

Aberdeen-headquartered Asco has secured four new decommissioning-related contracts worth in excess of £10 million.

The group’s NORM Solutions arm has won multi-year agreements with four operators to provide safe management and decontamination of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) on North Sea installations as they are decommissioned. The contracts will be further supported by deploying the group’s radiation protection supervisors, who manage the offshore processes required to identify and safely store and offload any contaminated material.

Chris Lloyd, head of environmental and decommissioning at Asco, said: "Since Asco acquired full ownership of NORM Solutions in 2019, the business has gone from strength to strength. The quality of our facilities and the professionalism of our team has played a major part in these contract successes and we greatly appreciate our customers' faith in the services we deliver.”

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The UK continental shelf has led the way in global decommissioning activity for the past decade and as this activity ramps up further, combined with a renewed focus on exploration and production, Lloyd anticipates continued growth at the decontamination operation.

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Headquartered in Aberdeen, Asco operates from more than 70 locations globally and employs some 1,400 people. Last month, the firm said it had agreed a key deal with the Storegga-led carbon capture and storage project in Aberdeenshire. The firm has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Acorn Project and the two parties will now go on to explore opportunities to collaborate, with particular focus on the Acorn Port project. Those plans seek to utilise the Peterhead Port jetty adjacent to the Asco south Peterhead supply base for the import of CO2 from dedicated carriers.

Asco's NORM Solutions arm has won multi-year agreements with four operators to provide safe management and decontamination of naturally occurring radioactive material. Picture: Simon Price

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