Historic Pollok House reopens following restoration project

It was once one of the most prestigious private residences in Scotland.

Pollok House was gifted to the City of Glasgow in 1966 by Anne Maxwell-Jardine, whose family owned the estate for almost 700 years. Picture: Donald Macleod/TSPL
Pollok House was gifted to the City of Glasgow in 1966 by Anne Maxwell-Jardine, whose family owned the estate for almost 700 years. Picture: Donald Macleod/TSPL

But Pollok House, and its 361-acre estate, passed into public ownership in 1966 and became a favourite destination for generations of ordinary Glaswegians.

Just three miles south of Glasgow city centre, the house and its gardens provided an oasis of greenery in Scotland’s largest city.

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Now the spectacular 18th century property has reopened following an extensive refurbishment programme carried out by the National Trust for Scotland.

The entrance hall to Pollok House. Picture: Stephen Mansfield/TSPL

The public will now be able to visit the Gun Room and Linen Room for the first time - allowing a glimpse into life “below stairs”.

Pollok House was completed in 1752 and replaced an earlier fortified structure.

It was the home of the powerful Maxwell family, who first settled on the estate in the 13th century.

The house was extended and modified throughout the 19th century but retains its core 18th century interior, including an impressive mahogany and marble entrance hall.

The kitchen in Pollok House. The property has been looked after by the National Trust for Scotland since 2001. Picture: Stephen Mansfield/TSPL

The east wing was built to house the Maxwell library and contains some 7,000 books.

Spanish art was a favourite of the Maxwells, with works by El Greco, Goya and Murillo all on display.

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In 1931, Sir John Stirling Maxwell convened a meeting in the cedar panelled smoking room that led to the creation of the National Trust for Scotland.

Pollok House has now reopened to the public following a restoration programme. Picture: Allan Milligan/TSPL

The building, its contents and surrounding parkland was gifted to the City of Glasgow by his daughter, Anne Maxwell Macdonald, in 1966.

The National Trust for Scotland took charge of the estate in 1998.

A link with the Maxwell family continues, however, as a suite of rooms is retained for their use when in Glasgow.

Karen Cornfield, property manager, said: “The completion of these works represents a very exciting time for us.

The entrance hall to Pollok House. Picture: Stephen Mansfield/TSPL

“While some of our artwork will still be housed at the Glasgow Museums Resource Centre for the time being, most of our much-loved collection has been reinstated in its proper home and we look forward to welcoming visitors and sharing our experiences with them.”

The kitchen in Pollok House. The property has been looked after by the National Trust for Scotland since 2001. Picture: Stephen Mansfield/TSPL
Pollok House has now reopened to the public following a restoration programme. Picture: Allan Milligan/TSPL