Alan Cumming hopes to move to Scotland after fears of being threatened and attacked in divided America

Hollywood and Broadway star Alan Cumming has revealed that a fear of being attacked and feeling under threat in the United States due to his political views has fuelled a desire to relocate back to Scotland.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon interviewed Alan Cumming at the Usher Hall in Edinburgh.

The Perthshire-born star, who has lived in New York for more than 20 years, said former president Donald Trump' s presence was still being felt in the US, which he described as "a country constantly on the edge".

Interviewed by First Minister Nicola Sturgeon at the launch of a new memoir in Edinburgh, Cumming said he wanted to live in a remote location with his husband Grant.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

However, he ruled out standing for political office when he comes back.

Alan Cumming and Nicola Sturgeon on stage at the Usher Hall in Edinburgh.

Speaking at the Usher Hall in Edinburgh, Cumming said he had found living in America "really difficult" and had a "scary incident" when he feared he was going to be attacked in the run-up to the election.

Cumming revealed he and his husband would be spending months living in Scotland next year, when he is going to be working on a new Robert Burns-inspired dance show for the Edinburgh International Festival.

The First Minister asked Cumming about the mental health struggles he writes about in his new memoir Baggage, including feeling suicidal when he was in the running for James Bond film GoldenEye.

The actor told how his work schedule and travel commitments had often helped him cope with the most difficult periods in his personal life.

Actor Alan Cumming launched his new memoir at the Usher Hall in Edinburgh with an in-conversation event with First Minister Nicola Sturgeon.

Cumming said although he had a “lovely time” at home with his husband Grant during the early stages of the pandemic, he became increasingly concerned about the future of America.

He recalled: “It was getting really difficult. I had a scary incident. I was actually scared that I was going to be attacked because I was getting all these death threats, and then this job happened, a TV series in Vancouver, which meant I was out of America for the election, which was so good.

"Obviously it is so great that [Joe] Biden won, but Trump is still very present. All these senators and congressmen still support him, and something like 70 per cent of Republicans still think that Joe Biden won the election unfairly.

"All those Proud Boys and white supremacists have been slightly silenced, but they’re still there. We’ve got to be vigilant.

"I feel America is constantly on the edge, more so than ever. It’s just so partisan, there’s no meeting of minds. There are people who are just furious and ill-informed. It’s a scary combo.”

Asked when he was “coming home”, Cumming said: “I feel that my Scottishness is so important to me.

"Being out of the country for so long has given me a really good perspective and understanding of the values I have. I feel very formed by being Scottish. I really do want to come back.

"Grant loves it here. Next year we’re coming to work here, so we will actually be living here for quite a long time.

"Before Biden got in, I literally felt unsafe living in America. It was a big thing to think ‘I’m going to completely change my life and come back’.

"But I feel I’ve grown more connected to my country the older I’ve got. I do see it as an arc of coming home.”

 0 comments

Want to join the conversation? Please or to comment on this article.