David Law on Vic Open celebration: I drank enough to not be able to count how many I had!

David Law celebrates making the last-hole eagle that earned him victory in the ISPS Handa Vic Open. Picture: Getty Images
David Law celebrates making the last-hole eagle that earned him victory in the ISPS Handa Vic Open. Picture: Getty Images
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David Law didn’t down the 15 pints he’d joked about but still celebrated his maiden European Tour win in a manner that would certainly have made both Paul Lawrie and Sir Alex Ferguson proud of him.

Twenty-four hours on, the 27-year-old Aberdonian is still pinching himself after finishing with an eagle to claim a dramatic victory in the ISPS Handa Vic Open in Australia.

The success, which came in just his fifth event as a European Tour card holder, earned Law just under £140,000, as well as an exemption until the end of next year.

In his post-event press conference, the two-time Scottish Amateur champion was asked how he planned to celebrate and replied, smiling: “Probably have 12-15 pints tonight!”

Speaking to The Scotsman from Perth, where he travelled earlier today ahead of this week’s Super 6 event, Law revealed that he had indeed enjoyed a proper celebration with some of his fellow players.

“I think I got to six, seven or eight, something around that,” he said, having been encouraged by Lawrie, his mentor and manager, to make sure he always savours that winning feeling, something that Sir Alex had drummed into the former Open champion.

“It was enough to not be able to keep count, put it that way, but not that many that I couldn’t walk home! I went out with Grant Forrest, Ben Evans, Max Orrin, Paul Dunne and his caddie. It was a good night.”

Law overcame calling a penalty on himself when his ball moved on the ninth green in the final round to storm home in 31 at 13th Beach Golf Club, producing the shot of his life at the last for a title-winning eagle.

The success lifted him into the top 20 in this season’s Race to Dubai and, though admitting he’d been tempted to jump on a plane to head home to see his partner, Natasha, and their two-month old daughter, Penelope, he wants to try and cement that position first.

“To win an European Tour event is something I’ve dreamt of for years and years,” admitted Law, who earned his step up to the circuit as one four Scottish graduates from the Challenge Tour last season.

“To do it the way I did on Sunday is beyond my wildest dreams. It’s not sunk in yet and I’m not sure it will for a long time. It’s a moment that I’m enjoying, definitely. But It’s back to business this week. I’ll enjoy it next week when I get home and let it all sink in then.

“I did say to myself on Saturday night, ‘if I win tomorrow, I’m straight on a flight home!’ But, on reflection, I knew I had a week off next week.

“I’m also playing good golf and I need to roll the dice again. I need to play this week and if I can ride the confidence from last week, anything can happen, especially in this week’s format.

“I don’t want to sit at the end of the year having missed out on the Race to Dubai or a top-30 spot - or whatever it is - by a few thousands Euros because I didn’t come and play here this week.”

Law has leapt from Category 14 to Category 4, meaning he’ll be able to pick and choose his events for the rest of the season, with guaranteed starts now in all the main tournaments on the circuit, including Rolex Series events.

“It takes a lot of pressure off,” he added. “I’ve come out on Tour this season with one of the lower categories and you are fighting to keep your job, effectively.

“The first year is always tough. You are going to golf courses you’ve never seen before and you need to go out and perform.

“In that respect, I now know that I am going to be playing on the European Tour for the rest of this year and next year regardless, which I think can only help your mindset and your game. It’s put me in a very privileged position.”

Law, who closed with a best-of-the-day 66 to become the first Scot to win on the circuit since Russell Knox landed the Irish Open last summer, revealed he’d spoken to Lawrie on Saturday night.

“He asked me how I was feeling and I said that on the Saturday, when I was in the second last group with a lot of people and cameras about, that I felt really comfortable,” said Law, a product of the Paul Lawrie Foundation before joining Lawrie’s new management company - Five Star Sports Agency - last year.

“I did not feel overawed by the situation and he said that was a great thing and that I just needed to carry on what I was doing. He said my attitude was so important going into Sunday and I managed to keep my cool the whole day, which was very important.”

In an interview towards the end of last year, Law spoke about how he’d been planning to take on a winter job before securing his crack at the European Tour after five seasons on the Challenge Tour.

“That’s at the back of my mind now, thankfully,” he admitted, laughing. “But it would have been something that I’d happily have done. I was prepared to do it and if I didn’t have a European Tour card I’d have to have done it because the Challenge Tour schedule doesn’t start until April and you need to go out there and provide for your family.

“Thankfully, I played myself out of having to do that. But sometimes that sort of thing can give you a kick up the backside as well.”

On and off the course, life couldn’t be better for Law right now and he admits that becoming a dad last year after suffering the tragedy of son Freddie being stillborn in 2017 has definitely been a factor in what he has just achieved.

“It’s been an incredible few months,” he declared. “We’ve enjoyed everything that has happened and we will continue to do so for a long time hopefully.

“I think the two things go hand in hand. When you are in a happy place off the golf course, it makes golf a hell of a lot easier and I think that’s probably transferred into my game as well.”