Rangers 'may have to play final Europa League game behind closed doors' at Ibrox after reports of sectarian singing at Feyenoord clash

Part of Ibrox was closed for the visit of Legia Warsaw earlier this year
Part of Ibrox was closed for the visit of Legia Warsaw earlier this year
Share this article
0
Have your say

Rangers face an anxious wait to learn if they will play Young Boys at Ibrox behind closed doors after reports of sectarian singing at the clash with Feyenoord last night.

UEFA ordered the Light Blues to shut part of their stadium for the visits of Legia Warsaw and Feyenoord, while the Gers declined to take any tickets for the away trip to Switzerland to play Young Boys.

European football's governing body has stringent rules on repeat offenders, with more than one media outlet reporting sectarian singing from visiting fans at De Kuip on Thursday night.

UEFA Article 14 states: "The following disciplinary measures apply in the event of recidivism: a. a second offence is punished with one match played behind closed doors and a fine of €50,000; b. any subsequent offence is punished with more than one match behind closed doors, a stadium closure, the forfeiting of a match, the deduction of points and/or disqualification from the competition.

"If the circumstances of the case require it, the competent disciplinary body may impose additional disciplinary measures on the member association or club responsible, such as the playing of one or more matches behind closed doors, a stadium closure, the forfeiting of a match, the deduction of points and/or disqualification from the competition."

Could further action be taken?

Rangers hit the headlines for a number of reasons during their short trip to Rotterdam, including:

• Fans holding up a banner which read "No Surrender. We hate Celtic, fenian b******s"

• Fans singing offensive songs about the Lisbon Lions as well as chanting: "Kick a fenian in the head and we'll petrol bomb his home"

• Reports of fans singing "F*** the Pope" in renditions of Neil Diamond's Sweet Caroline, sung at De Kuip Stadium

UEFA comes down hard on teams who are found to have repeatedly breached their rules and guidelines and Rangers are walking a disciplinary tightrope ahead of the body's expected decision early next week.

Anti-racism group Football Against Racism in Europe, known as FARE, works closely with UEFA and is understood to dispatch a delegate to every Rangers European game as a result of previous offences.

If either the FARE representative or UEFA officially records any instances of sectarian singing or similar at the game, Rangers - who have released statements condemning the fans involved - could be forced to shut their entire stadium for the final group match, which could be pivotal to Rangers' chances of advancing to the last 32.