Crossbar broken and turf as souvenirs: Wembley belongs to the Tartan Army on this day in 1977

Scotland beat England 2-1 to retain British Championship title

The crossbar comes a cropper as Scotland fans celebrate a famous win over England at Wembley in 1977. Picture: Denis Straughan/The Scotsman
The crossbar comes a cropper as Scotland fans celebrate a famous win over England at Wembley in 1977. Picture: Denis Straughan/The Scotsman

Scotland were in their mid-Seventies pomp when they secured back-to-back Home International triumphs with a 2-1 away win over England on this day 43 years ago.

Gordon McQueen and Kenny Dalglish struck to secure a famous victory and Scotland fans spilled on to the Wembley turf at full-time.

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The Tartan Army celebrated joyously following a game in which the scoreline flattered the hosts, such was the dominance of the Scots.

The goalposts were torn down while a number of supporters walked away with a piece of English football’s most hallowed surface – a memento from such a historic day.

Two years earlier, the visitors had been routed 5-1 at the same venue but, with Ally McLeod, now in charge, the Scots were a more formidable force on their next visit.

Scotland were in the ascendancy early on and Dalglish could perhaps count himself unfortunate not to be awarded a penalty after some heavy pressure from Mick Mills in the area.

However, the visitors went ahead three minutes before the interval when McQueen soared highest to power home a header from a free-kick. Dalglish was able to double their lead on the hour, scoring at the second attempt after his initial attempt was blocked, and although Mike Channon pulled one back with a late penalty, it counted for little.

Gordon McQueen scores in Scotland's victory against England at Wembley in 1977. Picture: Denis Straughan/The Scotsman

The final whistle sparked frenzied celebration from the travelling fans, while Scotland toasted finishing top of the Home Internationals table that year, retaining the trophy they had won in 1976. The Scots had earlier drawn 0-0 with Wales and beaten Northern Ireland 3-0.

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