Commonwealth Games: Brilliant bronze for Jake Wightman in 1,500m

Jake Wightman celebrates his bronze in the 1,500m PICTURE: Getty Images
Jake Wightman celebrates his bronze in the 1,500m PICTURE: Getty Images
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SCOTLAND’S Jake Wightman made a superb late surge to clinch a bronze medal in the men’s 1,500m on the final day of track action at the Commonwealth Games.

The 23-year-old Edinburgh AC runner produced a superb last lap to break what looked like a Kenyan 1-2-3, picking off Kumari Taki and threatening for a silver before coming in behind champion Elijah Manangoi and Timothy Cheruiyot.

The moment Kirsty Gilmour clinched badminton bronze for Scotland PICTURE: Getty Images

The moment Kirsty Gilmour clinched badminton bronze for Scotland PICTURE: Getty Images

Wightman clocked a time of 3:35.97, while fellow Scot Chris O’Hare, who qualified for the final as a fastest loser, finished eighth.

The Scotland women’s 4x400m relay quartet of Zoey Clark, Kirsten McCaslan, Lynsey Sharp and Eilidh Doyle set a national record of 3:35.97 but were never in the medals mix as Jamaica took gold, Nigeria silver and Botswana bronze ahead of England, Australia and the Scots in sixth.

In the women’s 5,000m, Eilish McColgand finished a good sixth and Steph Twell 12th for Scotland as Hellen Obiri and Margaret Kipkemboi secured a Kenyan 1-2, ahead of Laura Wightman of England, who won an excellent bronze.

Scotland’s badminton No 1 Kirsty Gilmour claimed the team’s other medal of the day as she defeated Canada’s Michelle Li 21-11, 21-16 to take the bronze medal. Earlier, the Scot was beaten by India’s Saina Nehwal in the women’s singles semi-final, going down 21-14, 18-21, 21-17.

Kieron Achara of Scotland shoots as Nicholas Kay of Australia defends during the semi-final match PICTURE: Getty Images

Kieron Achara of Scotland shoots as Nicholas Kay of Australia defends during the semi-final match PICTURE: Getty Images

The Scotland rugby sevens team’s medal hopes were ended by a 26-5 loss to defending champions South Africa in their final pool match, Jamie Farndale scoring a consolation try. The Scots will now face Wales first in the 5-8 classification games.

Earlier, the Scots started with a 27-0 win over Papua New Guinea thanks to two tries from Farndale and one apiece from George Horne, Darcy Graham and James Fleming.

They followed that up with an even more comfortable 41-0 thrashing of Malaysia, with Farndale again bagging a double. Horne also notched a brace, with Graham, Robbie Fergusson and Max McFarland also on the scoresheet.

The fairytale winning run of Scotland’s basketball team came to a shuddering halt against the might of Australia as they lost heavily in the semi-finals.

The red-hot favourite Aussies strolled to a crushing 103-46 win but the Scots will get a shot at bronze against Canada tomorrow after they lost to New Zealand.

Ali Fraser and Fraser Malcolm top scored for the Scots with nine apiece.

The Scots will now face the losers of New Zealand’s match with Canada for the bronze medal on Sunday.

In squash, the Scottish men’s pair of Alan Clyne and Greg Lobban lost their doubles semi-final 2-0 to Australian duo Zac Alexander and David Palmer.

In the cycling road races, Neah Evans came eighth and Katie Archibald 23rd in the women’s event. Dani Rowe won bronze for Wales in the women’s race. The 27-year-old, who switched her alliegance from England for these Games following her marriage, came in behind Australia’s Chloe Hosking and New Zealand’s Georgia Williams.

There was another Welsh medal in the men’s race as Jonathan Bould took silver behind Steel van Hoff of Australia. Track points race champion Mark Stewart was the highest finishing Scot in 17th, with mountain bike specialist Grant Ferguson 35th and Kyle Gordon 97th.

Grace Reid, Scotland’s gold medal diving heroine on the 1m springboard yesterday, finished ninth in the 3m springboard final.

Back at the athletics, the England men’s 4x100 metres relay team took gold.

The squad of Reuben Arthur, Zharnel Hughes, Richard Kilty and Harry Aikines-Aryeetey won in 38.13 seconds ahead of South Africa.

It was reward for Hughes who collected a gold medal after being disqualified from the 200 metres final having won the race.

The England women’s team of Asha Philip, Dina Asher-Smith, Bianca Williams and Lorraine Ugen ran 42.46 seconds - a national record - to finish ahead of Jamaica and Nigeria in their sprint relay.