Iceland stores closing this month: Check if your local branch is shutting for good by end of March 2023

Iceland is set to close more of its stores this month after shutting two supermarket sites in February - full list.

Iceland is set to shut a handful of its supermarkets before the end of March. A few Iceland stores have closed over the last few weeks, with the next one set to down shutters for good today (Tuesday, March 14).

The Iceland supermarket at the White Rose Centre in Rhyl, Wales will cease trading due to “continuous decline in business at the store”. The closure comes after branches at Mill Lane, Bromsgrove and Chineham Shopping Centre in Basingstoke shut at the end of February.

Which Iceland stores are closing by the end of March 2023

The following sites will close by the end of March:

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  • White Rose Centre, Rhyl - March 14
  • South Street, Newport, Isle of Wight - March 25
  • St Catherine’s Place, Bedminster, Bristol - March 25 
  • Deiniol Centre, Bangor - March 27

It is understood that the Isle of Wight store is closing due to an increase in rent and dwindling sales. In Bristol, the Iceland store is one of two frozen food specialists left in the shopping centre which is earmarked for a major redevelopment as part of the Bedminster Green regeneration project.

Four Iceland stores are closing across the UK this month.Four Iceland stores are closing across the UK this month.
Four Iceland stores are closing across the UK this month. | AFP via Getty Images

But Bangor residents aren’t set to be left high and dry when their local Iceland closes as a new Food Warehouse, which is part of the Iceland Group, is due to open the next day. The bulk-buying destination was founded in 2014 and was created to be Iceland’s “big brother”.

Iceland has around 800 stores and 150 Food Warehouse shops across the UK, bringing its portfolio to around a thousand sites. Despite the closures, Iceland said it was currently trading “very strongly” over the last financial year, when it opened 24 new stores in the UK.

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