Gender Pay Gap UK: Women earn almost £600 a month less than men, according to new research

Women take home around £600 less per month than men as their salary, according to new research by The Fawcett Society on the UK's gender pay gap.

Women take home £564 less per month than men, according to new research by The Fawcett Society. As such, campaigners are urging action to be taken on the gender pay gap in the UK.

The disparity has increased from 2021, where women reportedly earned £536 less pera month. The report also states 68% of women have struggled to pay their bills over the last six months. For women in minority groups, this number rises to 80%, according to the data.

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The Fawcett Society says  35% of women who want to work cannot because of inflexible working options and limited childcare. A further 48%  also say that should the gender pay gap in the UK be closed, the additional funds would improve their mental health.

The Fawcett Society has called upon the government to make changes in light of these statistics. Firstly, they have called for mandatory ethnicity pay gap reporting for employers.

They also say employers should make public action plans to help tackle the gender pay gap within their businesses. The society says  this will ensure “real action is taken to reduce pay inequality with accountability and transparency built in”.

In addition to this, they have also demanded employers offer more flexible working hours and conditions. Moreover, they also say  questions regarding salary history should be outlawed during recruitment processes.

Finally, The Fawcett Society has also called for a “right to know” what male employees at companies earn, in comparison to female employees. Gender pay discrimination is illegal under the Equality Act.

Jemima Olchawski, chief executive of the Fawcett Society, said: "Progress on tackling the gender pay gap is too slow and evidence continues to stack up that women want to see more being done.

" In the context of labour market shortages and the cost-of-living crisis, we really can’t afford not to act. We urgently need action from both the Government and employers."

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