Former England forward Frank Worthington dies aged 72

Frank Worthington has died following a long illness, aged 72, his family have announced.

One of English football’s great mavericks, Worthington died peacefully in hospital on Monday evening.

Worthington won eight England caps and represented over 20 clubs in a long playing career that began with Huddersfield in 1966.

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Worthington’s wife Carol paid tribute to the much-loved football showman, who died in hospital in Huddersfield.

“Frank brought joy to so many people throughout his career and in his private life,” Carol Worthington said.

“He will be greatly missed by everyone who loved him so much.”

Worthington’s daughter, Kim Malou, announced on Facebook in 2016 that he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, but he issued a statement the following day denying that he had the condition.

Unashamedly non-establishment, Worthington hit the headlines as much for his off-field exploits as his rarefied talents on it.

Frank Worthington, pictured during his time with Leicester City.

Once described by former Huddersfield and Bolton manager Ian Greaves as “the working man’s George Best”, Worthington played in 22 consecutive Football League seasons from 1966-7, scoring 266 goals in 882 appearances in all competitions.

In 14 of those campaigns he played in the top division, notching 150 goals in 466 matches, and won the Golden Boot award in 1978/79 as the leading scorer ahead of Kenny Dalglish and Frank Stapleton.

When his playing career ended, Worthington had a spell as manager of Tranmere Rovers and became an after-dinner speaker.

Worthington’s first club, Huddersfield, tweeted: “Everyone at #htafc is devastated to hear of the passing of Town legend Frank Worthington. Our thoughts are with his family and friends.”

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