Amber Rudd's daughter reveals she is 'haunted' after Alzheimer's test put her risk at 60%

Flora Gill, the daughter of Amber Rudd and the late A.A.Gill has revealed she is 'haunted' by a private blood test which put her risk of developing Alzheimer's at 60%.

The broadcaster, 28, says she bought the genetic test to explore her family's history but recalls ' bursting into tears' when she was told she had a 60% genetic chance of developing the disease. Picture: Instagram
The broadcaster, 28, says she bought the genetic test to explore her family's history but recalls ' bursting into tears' when she was told she had a 60% genetic chance of developing the disease. Picture: Instagram

The broadcaster, 28, says she bought the genetic test to explore her family's history but recalls ' bursting into tears' when she was told she had a 60% genetic chance of developing the disease.

The controversial tests, which can be ordered online, have been criticised in the past as they give a high degree of false positive results.

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Flora, speaking to The Sunday Times, said: "When I saw my gene results, I burst into tears. The duplicitous gene gifted from my parents was hidden somewhere inside me. I could feel it travelling through my blood, under my skin.

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"Now I have my results, I'm particularly aware of any mention of Alzheimer's, whether a character portrayed on television or a story recalled by a friend — every tale feels like a glimpse of my potential future."

The 28-year-old said her father AA Gill, who died in 2016 after a battle of cancer, was an ambassador for The Alzheimer's Society after watching his own father struggle with the disease.

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James Pickett, head of research at The Alzheimer's Society, said: "Anyone considering getting a genetic test should do so with their eyes open.

"It's a highly personal decision, but could cause great anxiety without the correct support and understanding. For anyone concerned about dementia, the first port of call should be a GP, not a genetic test."