This is what people are stockpiling for Brexit

If youre worried that a post-Brexit diet of tinned food might taste a little bland, youre not alone (Photo: Shutterstock)
If youre worried that a post-Brexit diet of tinned food might taste a little bland, youre not alone (Photo: Shutterstock)
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Political uncertainty has left many UK residents worrying about their food supply after Brexit

Some people are considering stockpiling food and other non-perishable items - but what exactly are they stocking up on? Here’s advice from some foodie experts.

Stocking up now gives supermarkets time to replenish and recover their stock (Photo: Shutterstock)

Stocking up now gives supermarkets time to replenish and recover their stock (Photo: Shutterstock)

Tins, tins, tins

For food writer Jack Monroe, it’s all about tins. In a blog post from November 2018, Monroe writes, “Stocking up now gives supermarkets time to replenish and recover their stock, so that come March, we won’t all be fighting over the same tin of tomatoes in the aisle.”

As well as tinned fruit, vegetables, fish, beans and other pulses, the writer recommends filling your shelves with dried carbohydrates, such as pasta, rice and instant mashed potatoes.

‘Flavours to make it bearable’

If you’re worried that a post-Brexit diet of tinned food might taste a little bland, you’re not alone. In her blog post, Monroe lists several spices, condiments and other items with a long shelf life that can help to make even basic dishes taste more exciting.

These include:

Chicken flavour stock cubes
Vinegar
Chilli
Bottled lemon juice
Garlic puree
Tomato paste
Canned soups – can be used as pasta sauces/stew bases
Anchovies

Non-food items

Monroe also recommends a few non-food items that you’ll struggle without, even if your shelves are full, including tin openers, washing up liquid and tin foil.

Grow your own

In an article for The Guardian, writer Dale Berning Sawa encourages members of the public to invest in “a stash of seed packets” and try their hand at growing some fresh food of their own, should a food shortage arise.

How to prepare

A member of the Money Saving Expert community told Verdict that they were slowly building up a food stockpile, simply by adding a few extra cans, tea bag or other dry items to their supermarket shop each week.

What you don’t need to stock up on

Consumables that the UK produce ample amounts of at home include whisky, chocolate and beer, so you don’t need to rush out and panic buy them, write Verdict.

We export more cereal products (like bread, rice and muesli) than we import, so these should also be readily available. A high number of dairy cows also means that our milk supply will likely go uninterrupted.