Sir Keir tries to excite the public by offering them a ‘contract’

Sir Keir Starmer opened the new year with a speech befitting the dullness of a day many of us returned to work.

The Labour leader does not boast off the charts charisma or wit, instead being a quiet man of substance whose accomplishments as a professional outmatch most of his peers.

You know that friend who was quiet at school achieved a lot but you never really saw him out? That’s Sir Keir.

He gets things done, you just wouldn’t really want to hear him talk about it.

And so far, it’s been enough, with his stature and appeal rising in the last few months as the Conservative party continues its quest to tick off every possible rule break.

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Sir Keir made hay by looking statesman-like, reserved, and criticising the UK Government without ever seeming hyperbolic or embarrassing like his predecessor.

With the Tories losing by-elections, albeit not just to Labour, his party soared in the polls sparking fears among Conservative MPs that a leadership change is needed.

The Prime Minister is bruised, bloody, and his legs are wobbling. His own MPs are openly talking about a change, and letters to the 1922 committee are going in.

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Sir Keir has had all Christmas to think of a knockout blow, a call to arms to open the year and get voters not just to reject the Tories, but embrace his party.

Instead he gave a speech even the most sympathetic Labour supporter would want to forget.

It wasn’t that it was bad or he said anything actively wrong, he just didn’t say anything at all.

The Labour leader instead lead on a “contract” with the British people, with the core principles of “Security, prosperity and respect”.

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If I wanted to hear meaningless buzzwords, I’d just watch the new series of The Apprentice.

Ultimately it’s an irrelevant speech, and it’s the tone of it that will speak to the public more.

While I’m desperately bored, they’ll see a leader unashamedly proud to be British, who wants to make their lives better.

But eventually we need to know how that’s going to happen.

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There is much to believe in with Sir Keir, but my word he makes it hard work.

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