Fake news that Donald Trump can believe in – leader comment

Paul Stokes (wearing glasses) and Neil Rafferty of The Daily Mash. (Picture: Geraint Lewis)
Paul Stokes (wearing glasses) and Neil Rafferty of The Daily Mash. (Picture: Geraint Lewis)
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“No-Deal Brexit recipes you can make without food”, “Trump jumped his skateboard over a car ‘but only his cousin saw it’”, “The five habits of highly effective time-wasters” and “The six most middle-class ways of exercising”.

Vital reporting for our turbulent times, we can surely all agree.

The Daily Mash, brainchild of former Scotsman business editor Paul Stokes and fellow journalist Neil Rafferty, has just been sold for a £1.2 million, after taking the online world by storm and even sparking a TV version, BBC2’s The Mash Report. What next, Mash the Movie?

READ MORE: Video: Mash Report on Edinburgh Festival goes viral

As far as The Scotsman knows (we did a quick Google search, but then got bored), it’s one of the few publications that hasn’t been repeatedly denounced as fake news by the Great Denouncer in Chief, Donald Trump, but then he’s probably already insisted that the skateboard story is actually true.

And maybe it is, maybe it’s all true. Just in case, here’s the Mash’s exclusive scoop on Trump’s future: pardoning John Wilkes Booth, being arrested for “megatreason” and ending up in a magnetic cell orbiting the Earth – but still running for president in 2020.

READ MORE FROM THE DAILY MASH: A guide to the Trump presidentcy of 2019