Roger Federer retires from tennis: Why Wimbledon record-breaker will always remain one of the greats – Scotsman comment

There are only a select few sportspeople who transcend their particular discipline to become known all over the world, but Roger Federer is undoubtedly one.

Roger Federer kisses the trophy as he celebrates victory after the men's singles final at Wimbledon in 2017 (Picture: Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)
Roger Federer kisses the trophy as he celebrates victory after the men's singles final at Wimbledon in 2017 (Picture: Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

The Swiss player, who has announced his retirement from tennis at the age of 41, became, for many, the epitome of his sport. At times, he was simply unbeatable.

He won a record eight men’s singles titles at Wimbledon and was a Grand Slam tournament champion for a total of 20 times; only Rafael Nadal, with 22, and Novak Djokovic, with 21, have more.

As he admitted that his “body’s message to me lately has been clear”, Federer paid tribute to his rivals, saying he was “lucky enough to play so many epic matches that I will never forget”.

"We battled fairly, with passion and intensity, and I always tried my best to respect the history of the game,” he said. “I feel extremely grateful. We pushed each other, and together we took tennis to new levels.”

Read More

Read More
Roger Federer announces retirement from professional tennis

That was a straightforward and honest assessment of his undeniable impact on the game, with no false humility.

But the idea of respect for the game – borne out by his actions on the court over the years – shows a lack of arrogance that is part of the reason why he will always remain one of its greats, regardless of the future achievements of others..

He was no prima donna, berating umpires, opponents or even members of the crowd when things did not go his way.

Instead, he played tennis with a sportsmanship that impressed both supporters of game and those with only a passing interest in it. He will be missed.

 0 comments

Want to join the conversation? Please or to comment on this article.