Survey finds St Kilda sea caves in good condition

The wide-reaching survey which was carried out in 2015 by a team of divers
The wide-reaching survey which was carried out in 2015 by a team of divers
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Researchers have captured “stunning” images of marine life in the waters around St Kilda as a survey revealed its reefs and sea caves are in good condition.

Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) has just published the findings of the wide-reaching survey which was carried out in 2015 by a team of divers.

A lion's mane jellyfish pictured in Village Bay, St Kilda. Picture: George Stoyle/Scottish Natural Heritage/PA

A lion's mane jellyfish pictured in Village Bay, St Kilda. Picture: George Stoyle/Scottish Natural Heritage/PA

Home to nearly one million seabirds, the St Kilda archipelago is the UK’s only dual Unesco World Heritage Site for both its natural and cultural significance.

It was evacuated on August 29, 1930 after the remaining 36 islanders voted to leave as their way of life was no longer sustainable.

The survey aimed to judge the current condition of the sea caves in the archipelago, which is situated around 40 miles west of the outer Hebrides and, in North Rona, north-west of Cape Wrath.

The team of researchers concluded that the site was in “good condition”.

Yellow and purple jewel anemones with netted whelks in St Kilda. Picture: George Stoyle/Scottish Natural Heritage/PA Wire

Yellow and purple jewel anemones with netted whelks in St Kilda. Picture: George Stoyle/Scottish Natural Heritage/PA Wire

The researchers also discovered a new species of soft coral (Clavularia) within one of the St Kilda caves.

SNH said that St Kilda hosts huge seabird populations, including the world’s second largest colony of North Atlantic gannets.