People warned to avoid Cramond Island this weekend as number of walkers getting stranded continues to rise

People are being urged to avoid walking out to Cramond Island this weekend as the causeway leading to and from the island will be unsafe to use due to rising tide times.

People are being urged to avoid walking out to Cramond Island this weekend.

It is unsafe to try to cross today, Friday, January, 29, between 10.40am and 6.40pm, tomorrow between 11.20am and 7.20pm and on Sunday between 12pm and 7.55pm.

Queensferry Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) have warned that rising tide times around Cramond Island this weekend mean that they are likely to see an increase in the number of calls to help walkers cut off by the tide.

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Two weekends ago, volunteers at Queensferry RNLI were called out three times to rescue stranded walkers.

People warned to avoid Cramond Island this weekend as number of walkers getting stranded continues to rise.

The first incident was on January, 15, at around 1.20pm when two people had to be rescued.

The second was slightly later at 1.40pm the next day, when two more people required help after getting stuck.

The third incident was the following day, January, 17, when one person needed to be rescued at around 2.15pm.

Since November 2020, 14 people and two dogs have been rescued by Queensferry RNLI.

To avoid this number increasing further, people are being asked to avoid the causeway when it is not safe.

If you live nearby and decide to walk across for your essential exercise, the RNLI have asked that you plan ahead before you go to reduce the risk of being cut off by the rising water.

Advice includes checking the forecast and tide times before you go, telling someone where you're going and ensuring you take a fully charged phone.

Michael Avril, RNLI Water Safety Lead for Scotland, said: “Our volunteers remain on call, ready to respond, but the need for our help can be avoided if walkers plan ahead by checking the tide times before setting off.

"Spring tides will make the high tides higher and they will also come in quicker. The danger in this is that people can get cut off quicker without even realising until it’s too late.

“Accidents happen, and it is important that you are able to call for help if you need it.

“If you find yourself or spot others in trouble, call 999 and ask for the coastguard straight away. Stay calm and don’t try and wade through the water as this could be dangerous.”

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