Bluebell woods

12 beautiful bluebell woods in Scotland to visit now

It may be the end of snowdrop season, but this means it is almost time for the bluebell to reign supreme in Scottish woodlands.

This delicate flower creates a colourful blanket from April, with the season reaching its peak in May. Around half of all the world’s bluebell’s are found in the UK, and our native species is protected. This means that walkers are urged to take care when passing through a crop of the flowers, especially within woodland as these blooms will have been there for a long time. For everything you need to know about different species and fun facts, visit The Woodland Trust.

As the name suggests, this woodland is an ideal place to spot some bluebells this spring. It is also one of the largest oak woodlands in Scotland, and was previously known as Ballathie Bluebell Wood.

1. Kinclaven Bluebell Wood, Perthshire

As the name suggests, this woodland is an ideal place to spot some bluebells this spring. It is also one of the largest oak woodlands in Scotland, and was previously known as Ballathie Bluebell Wood.
Julie Howden/WTML
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Glen Finglas is the Woodland Trusts largest site and an ideal location for a family day out thanks to its range of wildlife, including red deer and golden eagles.

2. Glen Finglas (Brig o Turk) Loch Lomond & the Trossachs National Park

Glen Finglas is the Woodland Trusts largest site and an ideal location for a family day out thanks to its range of wildlife, including red deer and golden eagles.
Geograph.org.uk
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Legend has it that this Highland glen was once the scene of a well-dressing ceremony, where children from the village decorated the village decorated a pool with flowers to ensure that the fairies kept the water supply clean.

3. Fairy Glen, Rosemarkie, Highlands

Legend has it that this Highland glen was once the scene of a well-dressing ceremony, where children from the village decorated the village decorated a pool with flowers to ensure that the fairies kept the water supply clean.
TripAdvisor
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On the banks of Loch Ness, Urquhart Bay is one of the best examples of surviving ancient wet woodland in Europe. Visitors can see bluebells and the different tree species, which include alder, ash, bird cherry and white willow.

4. Urquhart Bay, Loch Ness, Highlands

On the banks of Loch Ness, Urquhart Bay is one of the best examples of surviving ancient wet woodland in Europe. Visitors can see bluebells and the different tree species, which include alder, ash, bird cherry and white willow.
Woodland Trust
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