On this day 1745: Bonnie Prince Charlie marches Jacobites into England

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The Jacobites marched into England with much boldness - but the triumphant mood was weakened by a bad omen close to the border.

Charles Edward Stuart and his men left Dalkeith on November 3, 1745 for England with the ambition to reach London.

Prince Charles Edward Stuart and his men made it to Derby - just 125 miles from London - but did not win the backing of his officers to venture on to the capital. PIC: Creative Commons.

Prince Charles Edward Stuart and his men made it to Derby - just 125 miles from London - but did not win the backing of his officers to venture on to the capital. PIC: Creative Commons.

The Prince led one of two divisions, first heading to Kelso, and endeared himself to his men by marching on foot, through snow and mud, instead of mounting his horse as expected.

READ MORE: Story of the last Jacobite to be hanged

He remained in Kelso until November 6 and during his stay sent a party of 40 men across the Tweed to proclaim his father upon English soil before the group returned to the town.

The men advanced to Jedburgh before arriving in Liddisdale then at Haggiehaugh, now Larriston, which sits just a few miles from the border.

READ MORE: The lost children of the 1745 rising

The Prince marched down Liddel Water the next day, Friday November 8th, and entered England in the evening.

The celebratory moment was suspended when a bad omen descended, according to an account in the History of the Highlands by James Brown, published in 1852.

“When crossing the border, the Highlanders drew their swords and gave a hearty huzza; but a damp came over their spirit on learning that Lochiel had cut his hand in the act of unsheathing his sword, an occurrence which the Highlanders, with superstitious proneness, regarded as a bad omen,” Browne wrote.

Nevertheless, the campaign continued.

The army advanced to Carlisle with the city surrendering to the Jacobites on November 17 with a declaration for England, which had been earlier prepared in Rome, read at a ceremony at which the mayor and city alderman were forced to attend.

Several hundred Jacobites remained in the city as the Prince and his men ploughed onto Manchester. Here, they were met with loud acclamation and ringing of bells with supporters lighting bonfires and illuminating their houses to welcome them. A vast and successful recruitment exercise was undertaken to swell the Jacobite ranks.

The army ended up as far south as Derby, which lies just 125 miles from London.

The arrival in the town was, however, to be a turning point in the campaign after a council of war rule to retreat back to Scotland from the south.

The Prince had at no point even considered turning back but Lord George Murray, successfully persuaded the Jacobite officers that their army would be no match for what lay ahead in London or the forces that were now pursuing them from the north.

The promised support from France had yet to materialise.

On 6th December 1745, known to the Jacobites as Black Friday, the Jacobites began the march north from Derby led by Lord George Murray.

Within four months, the final test was to come at Culloden.