Work begins on new low carbon housing on site of former Edinburgh care home

Artisan Real Estate has started construction on the Rowanbank Gardens new homes development in Corstorphine as it aims to to meet the capital’s ambitious targets for low carbon housing

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Piling has now begun on site, following the granting of planning approval for 126 energy efficient homes with Artisan set to benchmark new standards in sustainable homes development on the site of the former Gylemuir Care Home which closed in 2019.

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Rowanbank Gardens industry-leading design is geared to achieving low to zero carbon development - as well as creating a more open and landscaped environment to benefit general health and well-being. It links closely with Edinburgh City Council’s ‘Future Edinburgh’ strategy which aims to make the city carbon neutral within the next ten years.

Work is underway on the site of the former Corstorphine care home

Smart building design has been matched with an innovative approach to placemaking and community - introducing such creative concepts as green roofs, ‘edible’ gardens and green transport plans to sensitive city centre environments.

The development is designed around a central courtyard garden providing nearly twice the level of open space recommended by council planning policy, filled with fruit trees and communal planting and growing beds. Apartments are designed for open plan living with large windows giving views of the courtyard and the wider area, while green roofs ensure benefits of surface water retention, insulation and ecology and reduced carbon output.

David Westwater, Artisan’s Scottish Regional Manager, said: “We are all excited to start at Rowanbank Gardens, which promises to significantly raises the industry bar on sustainable homes development. At its heart is a sustainable design which reflects the demands of modern life, with buildings designed to minimise carbon footprint and maximise daylight.

An artist's impression of the project

"Significant emphasis is placed on the quality of internal space and light to create enjoyable home-working environments, whilst accessible gardens and landscaping promote health and well-being by making nature and well-designed outdoor space integral to the day-to-day living experience.

“The site fits in well with Artisan’s approach of regenerating brownfield sites with good public transport links and is well set to meet the council’s stated requirement for well designed, high density living whilst providing spacious communal areas and well-established public transport links ensuring low car ownership. There are also all-electric charging points for the provided car parking, City Car Club membership and generous secure cycle parking.”

Artisan is perhaps best known in Scotland for large-scale city regeneration projects like the award-winning New Waverley, which has transformed the heart of Edinburgh’s historic Old Town.

Clive Wilding, the firm’s group development director, said: “We are specialising in niche urban developments in the most exciting parts of the city centre, creating a high-value premium product for a wide range of homebuyers, including young professionals, families and downsizers.

“Artisan now has an opportunity in Scotland to set a new benchmark for high quality urban regeneration in sensitive city-centre environments – whether it be commercial, residential or mixed-use. Our track record in Edinburgh and in Scotland has given us a strong understanding of the importance of high quality placemaking, which is at the heart of all Artisan’s developments.”

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