Read our rulebook then set it ablaze say bosses of Broxburn whisky firm

A West Lothian-based whisky company created a rulebook which can be ripped up, set on fire, and used in a drink

Read the rulebook and then rip it up, say Smokehead

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Single malt firm Smokehead encourages people to 'follow their path' and has created the world's first rulebook that's literally made to be ripped up - and burned.

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The limited-edition book features a wide range of contributors, such as rapper Professor Green and Dragons' Den investor Steven Bartlett, quoting advice given at the beginning of their career that would have held them back if they'd paid attention to it.

The quotes are designed to be ripped out of the book and set alight to 'smoke rinse' cocktail glasses included with the book, allowing the drinker to raise a toast to what never was.

Michael Sim, 31, is the brand ambassador for the company, based in Edinburgh and founded in 2005, and says the aim of the rulebook is to 'celebrate individuality'. The book has been released for sale this week for £39.99 after Michael and his team came up with the idea three months ago, and it successfully went through a three-week 'trial and error' creation phase.

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The paper is made with natural papers, with non-toxic vegetable oil that makes it safe to burn, before producing a scent made up of orange, peppercorn, and ginger oils. Michael, who is from Edinburgh, said: "Smokehead kind of ripped up the whisky rulebook when we created it back in 2005.

Capture the smoke in a suitable glass

"The idea was to put out the message that why can't whisky be mixed and enjoyed by everyone their own way?

"So we want to pay homage to this with the rulebook we have created. "The aim of the rulebook is to celebrate individuality. "The idea came about after having wide conversations. It was one of those things that has always been in the background of Smokehead. "We've been given advice in the past about how people perceive us and our brand, and we've always chosen to ignore it. "That was kind of the lightbulb moment. "We're always ripping up the rulebook, so we thought it was a great opportunity to make an actual book to be ripped up. "Nothing like this has ever been done before. "It was been a working process the last three months, but now we have launched two days ago. "There was a lot of investment into the project.

"It's really easy to use. "You read the book, and find a rule that you've been told, that resonates with yourself.

"So you rip it out the book, crumple up the paper and set it on fire. "You turn over your Smokehead glass and pop it over the bit of paper that's on fire. "That's you burning that rule and celebrating your individuality. There was a lot of testing phases.

Slàinte mhath.. time to savour a truly smoky single malt

"We knew this campaign was going to have an effect on Smokehead, so we wanted to make sure we got it right. "We tested different paper samples, with different elements and oils, to ensure we came to the right mix. "It's very safe to burn - although ripping up the rulebook should be dangerous."

He said there is too much stigma about how to drink single malt, with people being slated for using certain mixers - and that this needs to be cut out and people should 'drink it how they want'.

Michael added: "I think it's one of those unspoken rules of single malt.

After reading the rulebook apply a flame and torch it

"If you speak to anybody the first thing they say is if you put Coke in a whisky, people will slander you. "We are fully comfortable to know you should drink it how you want. "It was super important to us that the contributors to the book were creative trailblazers and people who are passionate about going on your own path. "Some of the rules in the book really show this. "Professor Green wrote 'a bad idea is better than no idea', while chef Neil Rankin wrote 'you're not supposed to enjoy your work'.

"My own personal rule that was ripped up is ''don't do anything crazy'.

"When you open the door on something like this, many individuals come forward with more stories.

"So it's great when you shine a light on the advice you've chosen to ignore.

"We're very proud of it and we only want it bought from people with who the message aligns with."

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