Scottish castle which was once a Clan stronghold up for sale

The estate includes potential for grouse shooting and deer stalking.
The estate includes potential for grouse shooting and deer stalking.
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An Aberdeenshire castle which was once the stronghold of the Gordon clan has gone on the market for £1.23 million.

Craig Castle Estate, which boasts a Grade A listed castle, as well as opportunities for grouse shooting and deer stalking, dates back as far as the early 13th century when, in around 1220, a previous castle of timber construction is documented to have stood to the south of Craig Castle. Little remains of the castle today, apart from a mound and a stone dovecot.

Craig Castle Estate is on the market for offers over 1.23 million.

Craig Castle Estate is on the market for offers over 1.23 million.

READ MORE: Scottish clan profile: Gordon

The castle – which is adorned internally and externally with copious heraldry from across the ages and is surrounded by gardens, policies and mature woodland in the glen of the Burn of Craig - is made up of a 16th century fortified tower house with 19th and 20th century additions. The whole estate totals 1,562-acres.

By the 15th century, the original timber castle was in a state of disrepair and the lands of Auchindoir were owned by the Irvines of Drum before they reverted to the Crown. In 1510, King James IV granted a charter of the lands in favour of Patrick Gordon, who commissioned the construction of Craig Castle. He was reputedly killed during the Battle of Flodden and the original castle was finished by his son William in 1548. The castle remained a Gordon stronghold for over three centuries.

The selling agent said the castle is in a "mixed condition", adding that the original core is "in need of renovation" but that the "inhabitable accommodation" includes three reception rooms and nine bedrooms.

Diane Fleming, selling agent for Strutt & Parker, said: “Castle Craig Estate occupies a fairy tale setting in one of the most private and stunning landscapes of Scotland. The land is varied, from low pastures to open heather hill and woodland, which in part is intersected by the meandering Burn of Craig.

“The estate offers abundant potential from reinstating the oldest part of the castle to its former glory, developing a former mill to create a further dwelling or studio/workshop and capitalising on sporting potential such as re-establishing grouse numbers."

“The castle in particular will capture the imagination of those with vision and ambition, as well as those attracted to history and architecture. The area offers a fantastic lifestyle near Aberdeen with attractions such as the renowned Scottish whisky industry and many outdoorsy pursuits on the doorstep including skiing, walking, cycling, shooting, fishing and stalking."

The sale, which can be sold as a package or split into five lots, includes two traditional cottages, a B-listed former mill with potential for development subject to the necessary planning consents, a block of mature coniferous woodland and open hill ground with mixed sporting and environment potential.

Ms Fleming added: “The estate is offered for sale as a whole or in five lots providing opportunities at several different levels of the rural property market. We expect it to attract significant interest from both British and international buyers.”

The 18th century wing – adjoined to the original by a connecting passage – is thought to have been designed by renowned architect William Adam. A Georgian addition, designed by Aberdonian architect Archibald Simpson, was constructed in 1832.

There are two former grouse moors on the estate and the selling agent said a renewed management programme could provide the opportunity for grouse shooting in future.