Culloden: Scottish Government considers position on luxury home by battlefield

The planned luxury home overlooks the section of battlefield owned by National Trust for Scotland. PIC: Creative Commons/Herbert Franks.
The planned luxury home overlooks the section of battlefield owned by National Trust for Scotland. PIC: Creative Commons/Herbert Franks.
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Plans to build a luxury home on the fringes of Culloden Battlefield are being reviewed by the Scottish Government.

The application to convert a steading at Cluachnaig to create a home, featuring a hot tub and zen garden, were approved by councillors in September.

The steading overlooks the part of the battlefield owned by National Trust of Scotland with claims the land on which it stands was significant action during the battle between Jacobites and the British Army in April 1746.

READ MORE: Culloden: Rejected holiday park plans for historic site revived once again
The plans were approved essentially as the development used a building that is already standing.

National Trust for Scotland and Historic Environment Scotland did not object to the proposals although they did note the sensitive nature of the site.

The Scottish Government noted its interest in the application when it lodged a 'Notification Direction' back in July.

READ MORE: What happened to the Jacobites who fought on after Culloden?
It requested that if Highland Council was minded to grant planning permission, full information had to be sent to Scottish Ministers prior to the plans being approved.

Scottish Ministers have until November 22 to make a decision on whether it wants to formally 'call in' the application and determine whether the home should be built.

The move comes amid increasing concern over the encroachment of development on the battlefield.

National Trust for Scotland owns around one third of the land where the battle was fought, with the remainder owned by private landowners.
Last year, 16 homes within the wider historic battlefield boundary were approved at Viewhill Farm.

Meanwhile, plans to build a holiday park with 13 chalets and a 100-seat restaurant within the historic boundary were rejected but applicants have indicated that they will come with fresh proposals early next year.

Concerns have been raised by historians that not enough statutory protections are in place for such sites.