Choir performance brings down curtain on Royal National Mod in Glasgow

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The curtain has been brought down on the Royal National Mod for 2019 ahead of the festival's return to the Highlands next year.

Numerous events have been held at Glasgow's Royal Concert Hall this week for what is described as the biggest Gaelic festival in the world - culminating in one final performance by several prominent choirs outside the venue on Saturday.

The event culminated in one final performance by several prominent choirs outside the venue on Saturday. Picture: PA

The event culminated in one final performance by several prominent choirs outside the venue on Saturday. Picture: PA

It is estimated the Mod has generated more than £2 million for the local economy, with organisers already planning the event's return to Inverness in October 2020 after a six-year absence.

An Comunn Gaidhealach also announced at the end of the week that the festival will be held in Oban in 2023 - the home of the very first Royal National Mod.

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John Morrison, chief executive of the group, said: "The Glasgow Royal National Mod has been a spectacular event.

"We're delighted that this year's Mod was a huge success and the importance of our Gaelic culture was at the forefront of the Mod.

"The level of competition has been stellar and it is great to see so many new faces joining the community alongside our regular attendees.

"We are grateful as ever to everyone involved in running this year's Mod, especially the local organising committee and all of our volunteers and sponsors.

"As the 2019 Mod comes to a close, we look forward to next year's event in Inverness, with planning already well under way.

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"We hope to see everyone there in Inverness to celebrate the culture and heritage of the Gaelic language."

Growth of Gaelic language

Earlier this week it was announced at the Mod that Scottish Gaelic would be added to Duolingo, a free online language learning service with more than 300 million users.

It is hoped the move will increase the number of people who speak the language around the world, with just under 60,000 speakers in Scotland, according to the 2011 Census.

More than four million people are learning Irish on the website and app, with 1.2 million signed up to learn Welsh, while courses in "indigenous and endangered" languages including Navajo and Hawaiian were also launched last year.

Allan Campbell, An Comunn Gaidhealach president, said: "It is excellent to see a large platform such as Duolingo recognising the growth of the Gaelic Language and taking action to support us in our efforts to introducing as many people to the language as possible.

"By enabling an easy, basic introduction, the platform will help to support all of the work we do with Gaelic Medium Education courses and existing learning platforms such as LearnGaelic, and hopefully we will see more people enrolling in formal Gaelic education as a result."