Weird Scottish laws you won't believe are still in place

9 weird and wonderful Scottish laws that are still in effect today

Have you ever accidentally set fire to a chimney, or fished for sea trout on a Sunday? In Scotland, you could be breaking the law.

Scots law is an interesting mix of civil and common law which traces its roots to several historical sources - meaning there are still a fair few bizarre laws in place that are a hangover from the past. These are 9 of the weirdest that are still around today - though there are few instances of them being broken in the modern age.

Thought to be a hangover from puritan beliefs banning recreation on God's day of rest, it is illegal to fish for salmon or sea trout on a Sunday in Scotland. More recently the law was confirmed to allow stocks to recover.

1. Fishing for salmon or sea trout on a Sunday

Thought to be a hangover from puritan beliefs banning recreation on God's day of rest, it is illegal to fish for salmon or sea trout on a Sunday in Scotland. More recently the law was confirmed to allow stocks to recover.
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According to Section 31 of the Town Police Clauses act of 1847, you can incur a penalty if you accidentally allow a chimney to catch fire in the building you're using or residing in.

2. Accidentally allowing a chimney to set on fire

According to Section 31 of the Town Police Clauses act of 1847, you can incur a penalty if you accidentally allow a chimney to catch fire in the building you're using or residing in.
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The Currency and Banknotes act of 1928 makes it an offence to deface a banknote by printing, stamping or writing on it. The Coinage act also makes it illegal to destroy a UK metal coin current since 1969 without a licence.

3. Defacing banknotes or destroying metal coins

The Currency and Banknotes act of 1928 makes it an offence to deface a banknote by printing, stamping or writing on it. The Coinage act also makes it illegal to destroy a UK metal coin current since 1969 without a licence.
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Right across the UK, it remains illegal to wear a full suit of armour into the Houses of Parliament. This was brought in during the reign of Edward II of England but the crime has rarely - if ever - been committed in modern times.

4. Wearing a full suit of armour in the Houses of Parliament

Right across the UK, it remains illegal to wear a full suit of armour into the Houses of Parliament. This was brought in during the reign of Edward II of England but the crime has rarely - if ever - been committed in modern times.
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