'Outlander village' makes it own tartan

A village whose fortunes have been transformed after it appeared in several episodes of the hit show Outlander has woven its own tartan for fans.

The new tartan for Culross in Fife will reflect the blues and the greens of the Firth of Forth and the rich palette of the village's unique architecture.
The new tartan for Culross in Fife will reflect the blues and the greens of the Firth of Forth and the rich palette of the village's unique architecture.

The medieval merchant's village of Culross in Fife was used as a location in seasons one and four of the time-travelling romance and has since been included on a number of Outlander fan tours.

Lindsey Marchant of Greengate Gallery in Culross and Claire Hunter, a weaver of Alloa, have now produced the tartan to offer a unique souvenir of the village.

The cloth has been inspired by the blues and the greens of the Firth of Forth, as well as the unique architecture of the village which was first created in the 16th Century by coal merchant George Bruce.

The unique streets of Culross helped to inspire the cloth.

Advertisement

Hide Ad

Ms Marchant said she wanted to offer fans of the show something special to take home.

Read More

Read More
Diana Gabaldon: On superfans, whisky and the ‘miracle’ of Outlander

She added: "There are so many tours and so many people wanting something special from Culross, and I just really wanted to be able to offer something unique.

"I have worked with Claire for a number of years and she came up with three designs. The one we have chosen really reflects the village and the surrounds,from the ochre-coloured Culross Palace to the blues and the greens of the Firth of Forth."

Advertisement

Hide Ad
Claire Hunter, a weaver from Alloa, has produced the cloth. PIC: Contributed.

Ms Marchant added that the show had had a "massive" impact on the village.

"We have coach tours coming in daily and the season has totally elongated. It is still quiet in January but it is busy for the rest of the year. Outlander is a magic word here."

The tartan has now been registered with the Scottish Tartans Authority.

Advertisement

Hide Ad
The tartan has been made into scarves and smaller items such as keyrings and mobile phone cases with a range of clothing due out next year. PIC: Contributed.

It is hoped that the cloth will be popular with locals as well as visitors to the village, which is largely owned by National Trust for Scotland.

Ms Hunter, who runs Taffled Threads weaving studio in Alloa added: "We wanted a traditional tartan but one that did not look like any other tartan. We launched it at the weekend and locals were so happy that they have a tartan they can identify with."