Scottish woman says botched nose job left her looking like 'car crash victim'

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A Scottish woman has told of the pain she suffered following a botched nose job.

Catherine Roan from Fife decided to have cosmetic surgery to reduce the size of her nose after years of insults and name-calling.

After four procedures, the 41-year-old was left looking like someone who had been in a bad car crash, according to a specialist.

After four procedures, the 41-year-old was left looking like someone who had been in a bad car crash, according to a specialist.

She opted to get surgery in the UK because she believed it would be safer than going abroad, and chose Transform because of its positive marketing.

But after four procedures, the 41-year-old was left looking like someone who had been in a bad car crash, according to a specialist.

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Transform’s Edinburgh clinic recommended Antonio Ottaviani, a doctor who flew in from Italy to perform the surgery.

Catherine Roan from Fife decided to have cosmetic surgery to reduce the size of her nose after years of insults and name-calling.

Catherine Roan from Fife decided to have cosmetic surgery to reduce the size of her nose after years of insults and name-calling.

He returned to Scotland to do three more operations on Catherine over four years in a bid to give her the nose he had promised.

When the cast was removed after the fourth procedure, she found “an absolute mess” underneath.

“My nose was worse than ever. There was a big skin tag, a skin fold hanging down one side, it was squint, there was something wrong with the tip,” she said.

Mr Ottaviani promised to fix her nose, but she insisted on a new surgeon – the work was paid for by Transform.


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But despite winning a medical negligence action against Mr Ottaviani, Catherine has only received 1 per cent of the £100,000 she was awarded.

When confronted by the film-makers, the surgeon said he could not comment on specific cases because of patient confidentiality and that five or six unhappy patients out of 6,000 was a very small percentage and far below average.