Scotland flu deaths: Highest weekly number of flu deaths recorded for 20 years

Scotland recorded the highest weekly number of flu deaths in 20 years last week, figures show.

Statistics released by the National Records of Scotland (NRS) on Thursday show the deaths of 121 people from flu were registered, an increase of 91 from the previous week.

The number of people who died as a result of Covid-19 also increased last week, with 101 fatalities registered that mentioned the virus on the death certificate, up 17 from the previous week.

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As of January 15, 16,568 deaths have been registered in Scotland where Covid-19 was mentioned on the death certificate.

Scotland recorded the highest weekly number of flu deaths in 20 years last week, figures show.

Nine people in total have died as a result of adverse effects of the Covid-19 vaccine, with four further deaths where an adverse effect was mentioned on the death certificate.

There was no change to this number in December 2022.

The total number of deaths registered in Scotland last week was 2,020, which is 29 per cent higher than the five-year average.

The standardised death rate for Covid-19 rose in December – 59 per 100,000 compared to 40 in 100,000 the previous month.

Throughout the pandemic, the highest death rate for Covid was 585 in 100,000 in April 2020.

Around 93% of people whose deaths involved Covid between March 2020 and December 2022 had at least one pre-existing condition, with the most common being dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.

Pete Whitehouse, director of statistical services at NRS, said: “The latest figures show that last week there were 101 deaths where Covid-19 was mentioned on the death certificate. This is 17 more than in the previous week.

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“Deaths involving influenza have risen in recent weeks.

“There were 121 deaths where influenza was mentioned on the death certificate in week two of this year, up from 91 in the previous week. This is the highest weekly number of flu deaths registered in over 20 years.”