Erskine charity for veterans reports 24 deaths in care homes

Scottish charity Erskine also report that 90 residents are thought to have been positive but are now recovering

Erskine have reported suspected COVID-19 deaths across three out of four of their care homes
Erskine have reported suspected COVID-19 deaths across three out of four of their care homes

Scottish charity Erskine has reported 24 resident deaths across three out of four of their care homes due to suspected COVID-19.

The charity runs homes in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Bishopton, three of which have reported resident deaths related to coronavirus.

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One death has been reported from the Edinburgh home in Gilmerton, 12 deaths reported from Erskine Park in Bishopton and 11 deaths reported from The Erskine Home in Bishopton with none in their Glasgow home in Anniesland.

A spokesperson for the charity confirms that three of the residents who passed away tested positive for the virus, and the other 21 were not tested as “testing was not widely available.”

They also add that four staff have tested positive and 90 residents across their homes have been barrier nursed (nursing with emphasis on infection control) with many now recovering.

This news comes just after it is revealed that more than half of Scottish coronavirus deaths are in care homes.

Last week saw 338 residents of care homes across the country die from either suspected or confirmed COVID-19, accounting for 51.5% of last week's coronavirus deaths.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said these results were "deeply distressing” adding that the numbers “demonstrates again how crucial it is to make care homes as safe as they can possibly during a pandemic of this nature.”

The Erskine charity has been running for over a century with its first care home, The Princess Louise Scottish Hospital for Limbless Sailors and Soldiers, opening in 1916 as a response to the need of World War One soldiers.

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