Social distancing measures in Scotland strengthened to protect workers

Temporary regulations have been enforced and extended to protect workers.

Social distancing regulations have been revised and strengthened in order to protect those still working during the COVID-19 lockdown.

Temporary regulations restricting public gatherings and non-essential business activity have been in force since March 26.

The rules, which are reviewed every three weeks, have now tightened to ensure the safety of workers and provide further guidance for people in Scotland.

The rules, which are reviewed every three weeks, have now tightened to ensure the safety of workers and provide further guidance for people in Scotland.

Recent adjustments include formalising the two metre distancing rules to all businesses that remain open. Businesses that do not take all reasonable measures to enforce those rules could be fined or ultimately prosecuted.

The latest legislation also says livestock markets and money advice services such as foreign exchange services can continue to operate, while holiday accommodation businesses can manage online and telephone services for bookings related to future dates. A technical change has also been made to clarify that burial grounds can stay open.

Constitutional Relations Secretary Michael Russell said: “I would like to thank people and businesses across Scotland who have been following social distancing measures over the last three weeks and helping to slow the spread of COVID-19 and save lives.

“From the outset, we have said these regulations are temporary and will be kept under review. After careful consideration, we have decided that it is necessary for these regulations to continue for the protection of public health.

“We have also made some minor amendments to the regulations to enhance their operation and social distancing for businesses, as well as making it more explicit that services relating to livestock, money, and online holiday bookings can remain open.

“The restrictions are tough and have had an impact on everyone’s lives but they are necessary to protect public health and our NHS, and we will continue to keep them under review.”

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