Johnson & Johnson single dose Covid vaccine found to be safe and effective - when will the UK get it?

The latest findings from Johnson & Johnson Covid vaccine trials found the jab to be safe and effective, according to the FDA (Photo: Shutterstock)

The latest findings from Johnson & Johnson Covid vaccine trials found the jab to be safe and effective, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has said.

The vaccine’s effectiveness varied in different countries, with 72 per cent efficacy in the United States, 66 per cent in Latin America, and 57 per cent in South Africa - where a new variant has spread.

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However, the FDA said that the vaccine was 85 per cent effective overall in stopping severe cases of Covid-19.

FDA briefing documents published on Wednesday (24 Feb) said the vaccine was effective in reducing the risk of Covid-19 and preventing PCR test-confirmed Covid at least 14 days after vaccination.

Three vaccine recipients had severe side effects in the trial, but the FDA said that its analysis did not raise any specific safety concerns.

The FDA’s vaccine advisory panel will meet on Friday (26 Feb) in order to discuss the vaccine and decide whether to approve the jab in the US.

J&J said earlier in the week that it would have four million doses available for the US immediately after it gains approval.

When could the UK get the Johnson & Johnson vaccine?

The J&J vaccine is made in partnership with Janssen Pharmaceuticals and is given as a single jab, whereas the Pfizer, AstraZeneca and Moderna vaccine - which have all been approved for use in the UK - require two doses each.

The J&J vaccine hasn’t been approved for use in the UK yet, but the Government has ordered 30 million doses of the vaccine.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock previously said that if the vaccine was approved by the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), it could "significantly bolster" the nation’s vaccination programme.