Subsea specialist JFD secures £20m MoD contract to support Astute class submarines

Subsea specialist JFD has been awarded a contract worth more than £20 million by the Ministry of Defence (MoD).

The firm, which serves the commercial and defence diving markets and forms part of James Fisher and Sons plc, is to provide a novel capability support contract for the Astute class submarine as a result of the tie-up.

The four-year contract, which has a one-year extension option, was awarded through competitive tender and began last month. It comprises a long-term support contract to provide equipment-level in-service support including core and non-core tasking, and the provision of spares.

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JFD, which has offices in Inchinnan in Renfrewshire and Westhill Aberdeen, said the contract will be managed out of its capability support hub near Faslane.

The firm has reeled in a long-term contract to provide equipment-level in-service support. Picture: Thomas McDonald/Crown Copyright.
The firm has reeled in a long-term contract to provide equipment-level in-service support. Picture: Thomas McDonald/Crown Copyright.

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The firm also said the facility has all the support capabilities needed to ensure a guaranteed service to the UK Royal Navy’s submarine fleet. JFD has partnered with RB Safety Consultants.

Richard Dellar, JFD MD, said: “I am delighted to be able to comment on this first for JFD, as navies around the world continue to rely on JFD to manage and maintain critical life support assets at exceptional levels of availability.

"Supporting our defence customers through long-term strategic partnerships is JFD’s core business,” he added, also stating that the firm will regarding its latest contract win deliver a “tailored, fit-for-purpose solution”.

JFD provides subsea rescue services, products, engineering services and training to 80 countries and 33 of the world’s navies, including those of Australia, Singapore, India and South Korea.

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