Shell to slash more than 300 jobs from Aberdeen workforce

Oil giant Royal Dutch Shell is cutting more than 300 jobs from its Aberdeen workforce.

The Shell Exploration and Production offices in Aberdeen. Picture: Andrew Milligan/PA

The posts will be lost over the next two years and form part of the thousands of jobs that the firm announced last September would go globally as it tackles a drop in demand.

The firm said that most of the 330 posts affected were based at its offices in Aberdeen. It will leave the oil major with a workforce of about 1,000 people in the Granite City.

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In September, Shell announced plans to cut between 7,000 and 9,000 jobs worldwide following a collapse in demand for oil amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The firm said the cuts would be fully implemented by the end of 2022 but did not provide a detailed geographic breakdown at the time.

The company also told investors that this included around 1,500 employees who have agreed to take voluntary redundancy.

Shell said at the time that the job cuts were part of a major cost-cutting programme after the business was hit by the slump in demand for oil and a subsequent dive in prices.

In a statement, a spokeswoman from Shell said: “Reduced organisational complexity, along with other measures, are expected to deliver sustainable annual cost savings of between two billion dollars to 2.5 billion dollars by 2022.

“This will partially contribute to the announced underlying operating cost reduction of three billion dollars to four billion dollars by the first quarter 2021.”

In June, rival BP said it planned to slash 10,000 jobs from its global workforce.

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