Comedy Review: Stephen Buchanan: Baby Dove, Pleasance Courtyard, Edinburgh

Wry and personable, with the endearing shtick of being a self-deprecating small man who still lives with his mother, Stephen Buchanan's immediately obvious everyman appeal has seen him win several high-profile awards and announce himself as a great hope for Scottish comedy.

Steve Buchanan offers up Baby Dove as a compassionate antidote to intolerance.

Stephen Buchanan: Baby Dove, Pleasance Courtyard, Edinburgh ***

But he's got another facet of his story that bears mentioning, the fact that he also lives with Dove, a Vietnamese refugee taken in by his social worker mother.

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Dove's journey to Glasgow is perfunctorily glossed over in its grimness. Yet, once established, it allows Buchanan to draw out the comically misinformed bigotry of some of his neighbours, and inspires a series of culture clash misunderstandings, with the comic's struggle to adequately explain Halloween being a particularly entertaining example. With his preference for focusing on human aspects, rather than the political quagmire of immigration,

Buchanan keeps his observations localised and light. And he's a deft storyteller, negatively contrasting his own incapacity to leave the family nest with Dove's enforced flight. However, that doesn't preclude him from taking an amusingly contrived chance to have a pop at a certain British newspaper and the hostile views they promote, offering up Baby Dove as a compassionate antidote to such intolerance.

Until 25 August