Donald Trump petition: 500,000 signatures to stop UK state visit

Demonstrators protest against President Trump's immigration ban at Chicago O'Hare International Airport. Picture: AFP/Getty Images
Demonstrators protest against President Trump's immigration ban at Chicago O'Hare International Airport. Picture: AFP/Getty Images
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Nearly half a million people have signed a petition calling for an invitation to Donald Trump to make an official state visit to the UK to be rescinded.

The petition, created by Graham Guest, has attracted significant interest just a few hours after it was created on Sunday.

Calling for the official state visit to be prevented, it cities ‘Donald Trump’s well documented misogyny and vulgarity’ as a reason to disqualify him from being received by Her Majesty the Queen or the Prince of Wales.

It reads: ““Donald Trump should be allowed to enter the UK in his capacity as head of the US Government but he should not be invited to make an official State Visit because it would cause embarrassment to Her Majesty the Queen”.

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The government responds to all petitions that garner 10,000 signatories and those with 100,000 signatures must be considered for debate in Parliament.

The petition comes as opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn called for Mr Trump’s visit to be postponed for as long as his immigration ban is in place.

Prime Minister Theresa May came under pressure to condemn Mr Trump’s immigration policy, which has banned entry to the United States to nationals from seven Muslim majority countries, including those with dual nationalities (including British).

Ms May has now directed Foreign Secretary Boris Johsnon and Home Secretary Amber Rudd to make calls to their counterparts in the US.

At the time of writing, 464,000 people had signed the online petition.

Campaigners are also calling for support to stage ‘the biggest protest ever’ in London should President Trump’s official visit to the UK go ahead.