Opinion

News Opinion

Bill Jamieson: Sturgeon setting sail without a rising tide

The SNP must pay heed to fears of small businesses before charting a new course towards indyref2, says Bill Jamieson

Opinion 6
Livingston has become an 'acceptable compromise' for some renters, says David Alexander. Picture: Lisa Ferguson

David Alexander: Branching out into the commuter belt

The BBC’s Reporting Scotland recently filmed a meeting of Musselburgh residents, held as a result of complaints about the local rail service to and from Edinburgh.

Markets Economy
Antares, the newest vessel in the Shetland pelagic fleet

So what’s Patty Hearst got to to with Brexit and Scottish fishing?

Some of us are old enough to remember the Patty Hearst case. Just to jog those grey cells, and for the benefit of the younger generation, she was the Californian heiress kidnapped by a revolutionary gang back in 1974. She came to sympathise with her captors and was caught after she joined them in a bank robbery.

Opinion
Professor Tony Trewavas FRS. FRSE. Scientific Alliance Scotland

UK should be generating research into world-changing cold fusion system

In 1989, two scientists at the University of Utah claimed that they had succeeded in generating cold nuclear fusion in a laboratory under entirely safe conditions. At a press conference they indicated they had been passing an electrical current (electrolysis) through heavy water (deuterium oxide) spiked with lithium salt. They had detected the anomalous generation of heat energy up to tenfold in excess of any energy input from the electrolysis current. The immediate media coverage was enormous and ecstatic but rapidly turned very negative when some other laboratories failed to detect anomalous heat production. Some scientists misleadingly claimed it to be a hoax, even voodoo science. The reasons for replication failure were uncovered within a couple of years – lack of care in using identical experimental conditions. But the real sticking point was the claim of fusion. Orthodox physics dictated that such fusions or nuclear reactions had to involve very high temperatures in plasma and either in the sun or in tokamaks – a magnetic confinement system – here on earth. As one scientist pointed out, if genuine fusion had occurred, the two scientists would have quickly died from the radiation emitted.

Opinion 1

Keith Howell: Is it sensible to give up our UK-ness for a very harsh economic reality check

Putting words into the mouths of opponents can make it easier to deride and dismiss them. An example is one of the most emotive and oft-repeated sound-bites of the 2014 Scottish independence referendum campaign, apparently denigrating Scotland’s size, economy and people.

Opinion
Edinburgh 
Skyscanner staff are able to take breaks during their working day in comfy seating zones as well as recreational areas, where games are provided. 


 Picture: Neil Hanna

Cameron Stott: Going into the office will remain relevant

Twenty-five years ago, jumping on your bicycle to get to work would not have been a commonplace occurrence.

Opinion

William Loneskie: Austerity? For most of us, it’s never been so good

“Tory austerity” comes the cry, after “Tory cuts” was worn out. The truth is most of us have never had it so good.

Opinion
The House of Lords is unelected, irrelevant and should be abolished.

John Maguire: Yes, let’s have another referendum – to abolish the House of Lords

What’s the difference between the House of Lords and the Presidents of the EU? They are all unelected; unaccountable to the people; undemocratic; and paid far too much money.

Opinion
Delegates in buoyant mood after Nicola Sturgeon's keynote speech at the SNP conference. Picture: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Kenny MacAskill: Case for independence needs a proper answer to currency question

There’s an old saying that a week is a long time in politics. The past seven days has shown that to be the case in Scotland, as elsewhere. The SNP spring conference gathered in Aberdeen last weekend. What might have been anticipated as being a challenging event for the party leadership instead became a rallying call for the party faithful.

Opinion 38
Armed police officers stand guard on the corner of Parliament Square, near the Houses of Parliament in central London during an emergency incident. 
Police shot dead  a suspected attacker outside the Houses of Parliament in London on after an officer was killed in what police said was a "terrorist" incident. Picture: Getty Images

Leader comment: Britain’s police need to routinely carry guns

The sight of paramedics crouching over a body on Westminster Bridge while the Prime Minister is evacuated to safety and MPs are put under lockdown yards away in the Houses of Parliament is extremely chilling and harrowing.

Politics 4
The Princess Royal has spoken out in favour of the use of genetically modified (GM) crops, arguing the technology has real benefits. Picture: Steve Parsons/PA Wire

Leader comment: Time for change on GM crops

So the debate over genetically modified crops again comes to the fore with Princess Anne saying the crops have important benefits for providing food and health benefits for animals and she would be open to growing them on her own land.

Opinion 3
Armed police stand guard outside the Houses of Parliament after the terrorist attack. Picture: Getty Images

Tom Peterkin: Attacks on London put Scottish politics into perspective

Terror at Westminster reminds us that values of democracy must be treated with respect, writes Tom Peterkin

Opinion 18
While the right diet is important when keeping cholesterol at bay, exercise remains one of the keys to a healthy heart. Picture: Michael Gillen

Kevan Christie: Time to crack some of the myths about cholesterol

The publication of a study last week showing a new drug will prevent heart attacks and strokes has put cholesterol, the long-time whipping boy for all things cardiovascular, back in the spotlight.

Opinion
President Truman introduced the loyalty executive order, which paved the way for McCarthyism. One of the darkest chapters in US political history could be about to return. Picture: Getty Images

Martyn McLaughlin: Order which sparked Red Scare is a warning from history

THERE are echoes of Harry Truman’s loyalty order in Donald Trump’s administration, writes Martyn McLaughlin

Opinion 2
In a historic gesture the Queen shook the hand of Northern Ireland Deputy First Minister and former IRA commander Martin McGuinness in 2012.

Leader comment: Martin McGuinness changed, but cannot be forgiven

Everybody should have the chance at redemption, and the terrorist turned politician Martin McGuinness played a significant role in bringing peace to Nothern Ireland.

Opinion
Better to gain your stripes than chase chimeras, argues Jim Duffy. Picture: Ian Howarth

Jim Duffy: Do you want to be a zebra or a unicorn?

I recently met two “younger than me” entrepreneurs who are part of a group of millennials eager to start and grow businesses, but who do not want to be classed as “unicorns”.

Tech 1
Dundee is home to video game companies including Minecraft developer 4J Studios. Picture: Phil Wilkinson

Martin Flanagan: Dundee’s game for the digital challenge

More evidence today that down-with-the-kids Dundee continues to leave its historical roots of jam, jute and journalism firmly in the rear-view mirror.

Tech 1
The Scottish diaspora is celebrated in the Tartan Day festivities in New York. Picture: Donald MacLeod

Eliot Wilson: Why am I not Scottish enough to cast a vote?

If you can play or fight for Scotland, you should be able to have a say in its future, says Eliot Wilson.

Opinion 21
It makes business sense for companies to invest in cyber security. Picture: David Moir

Mandy Haeburn-Little: Business needs cyber-security experts

What if your day started with a cyber forecast as well as a weather forecast?

Opinion
The Scottish Cup Edinburgh derby clashed with European football. Picture: Ian Georgeson.

John V Lloyd: Scottish football’s bosses have ignored fans

In 1424, the ­Scottish parliament tried to ban ‘fut ball’. The fine for playing was four pennies. By the 17th century the game was ­popular across Scotland and the Scottish Football Association was created in 1873.

Opinion 4
Load more