Scotland's six UNESCO World Heritage sites celebrated at national museum

SIX of Scotland's most treasured historic sites were celebrated today at the National Museum of Scotland.

Ring of Brodgar on Orkney. Picture: iStock

Visitors were invited to the Edinburgh museum to learn more about a group of UNESCO-certified attractions whose histories span thousands of years.

Edinburgh’s Old Town and New Town formed part of the exhibit, which featured interactive elements allowing visitors to explore sites less readily available to them.

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These included St Kilda, whose last permanent inhabitants left in 1930, and the Heart of Neolithic Orkney, a group of ancient monuments that includes Skara Brae, the Standing Stones of Stenness, Maeshowe and the Ring of Brodgar.

A steam train on the Forth Bridge. Picture: Malcolm McCurrach

New Lanark, the Antonine Wall and the Forth Bridge were also showcased by the museum.

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Alice Lyall from Historic Environment Scotland, said: “It’s been great to see so many people come along today and enjoy themselves. We want as many people as possible to find out about the sites, what makes them so important, and why we have to protect them for future generations – in a fun and interactive way.

“There are six World Heritage sites in Scotland, but together they encompass hundreds of miles, and span thousands of years, so it takes a huge effort from a large number of organisations such as Historic Environment Scotland, Scottish Government, local authorities, public bodies, community groups and trusts, and of course many volunteers, to protect, enhance, and present the sites to the level they require.”

Edinburgh's Victoria Street in the Old Town. Picture: TSPL
A steam train on the Forth Bridge. Picture: Malcolm McCurrach
Edinburgh's Victoria Street in the Old Town. Picture: TSPL