Could this be one of the best jobs in Scotland?

You'll be based in one of the most beautiful parts of Scotland, in one of the last wild areas of the UK - and you won't have to work weekends.

The Cairngorms National Park Authority is on the hunt for a new Director of Conservation and Visitor Experience. Picture: Graham Norrie / Flickr CC
The Cairngorms National Park Authority is on the hunt for a new Director of Conservation and Visitor Experience. Picture: Graham Norrie / Flickr CC

The Cairngorms National Park Authority is on the hunt for a new Director of Conservation and Visitor Experience, to be based at the authority’s headquarters in Grantown on Spey.

Tasked with ensuring the conservation of the Cairngorms National Park and the experience of visitors ‘complement each other in this protected landscape’, the successful candidate will be asked to provide ‘strategic leadership, clear organisational vision and long-term direction’ for the authority on Conservation and Visitor Experience.

The authority are seeking an individual with ‘strong leadership, management, organisational, analytical, interpersonal, communication and negotiation skills’ and are looking for candidates with experience of ‘developing and implementing policy in any one or more of a number of relevant subjects in the general area of conservation and visitor experience’.

The headquarters, based in Grantown on Spey, is close to Aviemore and Inverness and the role offers a cycle-to-work scheme, childcare vouchers, a ‘generous annual leave allowance’, flexitime and a competitive pension scheme.

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The salary will be between £51,492 and £59,907, with candidates asked to work 37.5 hours per week spread over Monday to Friday.

The Cairngorms National Park welcomes 1.7 million visitors every year, who come to walk and cycle, use the facilities and experience all the park has to offer.

The park is home to more high level mountain ground than anywhere else in Britain and contains the largest Caledonian forest, along with some of the UK’s ‘purest rivers’ as well as being home to a quarter of the UK’s threatened species such as the Scottish wildcat, red squirrel and capercaillie.