Celtic's Ange Postecoglou: I'm not an epidemiolgist, archaeoligist, or any kind of oligist. I’m a pretty simple guy

It is a surprise to discover that Ange Postecoglou has never been aware of the serenity prayer.

Celtic manager Ange Postecoglou says he is mindful that every time he is in front of the media or meeting people in public he is representing the the value of the club, and his own values. (Photo by Craig Foy / SNS Group)
Celtic manager Ange Postecoglou says he is mindful that every time he is in front of the media or meeting people in public he is representing the the value of the club, and his own values. (Photo by Craig Foy / SNS Group)

Especially when it feels that the Celtic manager has been living it out. Religiously. He has proved unfailingly sure-footed at avoiding going down rabbit holes over officialdom, club disputes or any of the other froth predecessors have tended to become enveloped in. So much so, the petition to a higher power to provide the serenity to accept the things you can’t change, have the courage to change things you can and the wisdom to know the difference between the two could be embossed on his business card.

“I cottoned on very early in my managerial career that there are certain things that were in my control and what I wanted to do,” said the Australian, who boasts almost 30 years trackside experience. “For the most part I didn’t get diverted or distracted from that because that is my ultimate responsibility. I represent a football club, I represent the players, the staff and everyone associated with it in terms of the fans, and I want to make sure what I present stays as close to the values and the intent that I believe will make us successful.

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“In any walk of life, if you get distracted or taken away from that focus and try and control things you know that ultimately you are never going to have an effect on, I think you absolve yourself of your responsibility. I’ve seen it often as I’ve been managing for a very long time. I’ve seen people who take a different approach and really get riled up about refereeing decisions or things outwith their control and I just think ultimately my responsibility rests on what happens between the white lines on the turf. And I want to make sure that every day my players, my staff and everyone involved with the football club knows that is where I am putting my attention.”

The Australian makes that sound straightforward. But, in the past two years alone, we have witnessed a host Scottish managers turn epidemiologists, politicians, and all sorts inbetween. The febrile atmosphere created by football fanaticism in this country almost begets that, especially as regards the role at Celtic role that is among the most high profile in the land.

“Not really mate,” the Celtic manager said. “I have never seen myself as an epidemiolgist, archaeoligist, or any kind of oligist. I’m a pretty simple guy in terms of knowing what I need to know. And at the same time I understand I am a spokesman for the football club in as much as what I say, not just in the media but when I am out and about meeting people in public. Every time I open my mouth I am representing this football club and I want to make sure that what I say, and my actions, reflect the values of the club I’m at and my own values. Sometimes that means I don’t answer questions about things that I believe are answered by other people with more expertise than me. I’m comfortable with that. I’m not insecure with the fact my expertise lies in certain areas and happy to absolve the responsibility for other matters to other people.”

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