Hillwalker bags tenth circuit of Munros to add to women’s record

Hazel Strachan, 50, completed the feat by scaling Carn an Tuirc, near Braemar. Picture: MunroEditor/Wikimedia
Hazel Strachan, 50, completed the feat by scaling Carn an Tuirc, near Braemar. Picture: MunroEditor/Wikimedia
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A female hillwalker has extended her “Munro-bagging” record by finishing a tenth circuit of Scotland’s mountains over 3,000ft.

Hazel Strachan, 50, completed the feat by scaling Carn an Tuirc, near Braemar, 
yesterday.

The Scottish Government agricultural scientist from Bathgate has bagged all 282 Munros every year over the past six years – a total of 1,692 peaks – among 2,826 in all.

She has pledged to continue, and has already completed 50 Munros in her 11th series.

Ms Strachan became the record-breaking woman after a seventh circuit in 2015.

She has not ruled out trying to beat Edinburgh-based Steven Fallon record of 
completing the Munros 15 times. They were collectively named after Hugh Munro, who compiled a list in 1891.

Ms Strachan told BBC Scotland: “I am absolutely delighted. It’s been a fantastic journey.

“I have learned so much about myself and about the mountains as well.

“I’ve had great people behind me, including a great physio.

“I love the self-reliance, the planning, the physicality of it all, and the tremendous 
views.

“There are still lots of routes which I would like to climb in different weathers and 
seasons.”

Ms Strachan is supported by her husband, Ian, 67, who provides back up from the couple’s motor home.

They spend most of their free time following the pursuit, and she bagged 14 
Munros in a day in June last year. They have climbed 33 Munros together, but Ms Strachan normally walks alone.

She completed her first Munro in 1980, but “only really got started” after moving from her parents’ farm 18 years ago.

Mr Strachan said: “I am very proud of her and I am absolutely amazed she is able to do what she does. When she completed the first round, I thought that’s it, we’ll go and do other things, but then she told me, ‘No, no I want to continue to do it – I want to get the women’s record’.

“The women’s record was six rounds, so she had to do seven.

“And once she completed seven, then I thought well, that’s it, that’ll be fine, but she said ‘No, I want to continue to do them’.”