US Election: Queues as America goes to polls after bitter campaign

Workers prepare the stage for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's election night event in New York. Picture: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images
Workers prepare the stage for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's election night event in New York. Picture: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images
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Lengthy queues were reported at polling stations throughout the US yesterday, with Hillary Clinton expected to claim victory over Donald Trump in the race for the White House.

After a long and acrimonious campaign, voters turned out in their droves to decide who will become the 45th president of the US, with some people waiting up to 90 minutes to have their say.

Long queues formed at polling stations in New York and Brooklyn, echoing the high turnout seen in states with advance voting, such as Florida and Nevada. A record number of Americans – more than 46 million – have voted early by post or at polling stations.

Mrs Clinton and her husband, former president Bill Clinton, arrived at their local polling station in Chappaqua, New York, shortly after 8am as a crowd of cheering supporters took photographs. “It’s a humbling feeling,” the Democrat candidate said. “I know how much responsibility goes with this. So many people are counting on the outcome of this election, what it means for our country, and I will do the very best I can if I’m fortunate enough to win today.”

Mr Trump arrived with his wife, Melania, at a polling station in Manhattan shortly after 11am. He was cheered and booed by a crowd as he left his motorcade, waving to members of the public. The Republican candidate also found time to telephone Fox News, telling the broadcaster that he wanted to tap unrealised potential in the US, but he later returned to familiar territory, casting doubt over whether he would accept the result of the election, having continuously alleged the process is rigged.

• READ MORE: US Election essentials: When will the winner be announced? What time is it on in the UK? Who is ahead?

Hillary Clinton and Jon Bon Jovi gesture to the crowd at North Carolina State  for the final campaign stop before election day. Picture: AFP/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton and Jon Bon Jovi gesture to the crowd at North Carolina State for the final campaign stop before election day. Picture: AFP/Getty Images

He told reporters: “We’re going to see how things play out. I want to see everything honest.”

Speaking to CNN later in the day, Mr Trump alleged there had been voting machine malfunctions, telling the station: “There are reports that when someone votes Republican the entire ticket switches over to Democrat. It’s the machines.”

Speaking after his election day tradition of playing basketball with friends, president Barack Obama said his faith in the American people has not wavered.

Asked whether he was feeling nervous about the outcome of the election, the incumbent said: “I think we’ll do a good job,” as long as the American people went out to have their say.

With less than 24 hours until Election Day in the United States, Trump and his opponent are campaigning in key battleground states.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

With less than 24 hours until Election Day in the United States, Trump and his opponent are campaigning in key battleground states. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

The voting began shortly after midnight in the small New Hampshire village of Dixville Notch, where seven votes were cast - four for Mrs Clinton, two for Mr Trump and one for Gary Johnson.

However, the day of reckoning was not without controversy after the Trump campaign alleged polling place “anomalies” during early voting in the Las Vegas area last week.

A lawsuit filed yesterday in a Nevada court asked that records from four early voting spots that allegedly stayed open too late last Friday be impounded and preserved. The Clinton’s campaign dismissed the case in a message posted on Twitter, calling it a “frivolous” lawsuit.

There were also claims that Mr Trump’s son, Eric, may have broken New York state law by tweeting a photo of his completed ballot.

The 32-year-old posted the image of social media, writing: “It is an incredible honor to vote for my father!

“He will do such a great job for the U.S.A!”

It was later deleted from his Twitter account. An 1890 New York law bans voters from showing marked election ballots to others.

A federal judge ruled last week that the law applies to social media posts.