Stevie Wonder: A vote for Trump is like asking me to drive

Musician Stevie Wonder performs at a campaign rally for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. Picture: AP Photo/John Raoux
Musician Stevie Wonder performs at a campaign rally for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. Picture: AP Photo/John Raoux
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Voting for Donald Trump is akin to asking Stevie Wonder to drive, the blind singer said as he threw his weight behind Hillary Clinton in the US presidential election.

Wonder made the comparison during a Get Out And Vote concert where he was drumming up support for the Democratic candidate.

In an interview with US publication philly.com, the singer said Ms Clinton’s experience and “respect and love for all people” were the contributing factors in his decision to back her.

“My youngest child is one year old. She is a junior millennial. So I’m looking at the future.

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“I’ll give you a point of reference. As much as you have great love for me and you think I’m funny and la la la la la and I make you laugh and all that, if you had an emergency situation and needed to go to the hospital, and you had to get there right away, would you want me driving your car?,” Wonder said.

The Superstition singer added: “So my belief is that Hillary is an experienced person of the government, and she has spent 30 years with a commitment.

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“Not to mention that her parents taught her in a kinder way, to have respect and love for all people. That’s the person I want to govern, to be the leader of this nation.”

On Tuesday tens of millions of voters across the United States will decide on the next occupant of the White House as polling stations open across the country.

Ms Clinton aims to become the first female president in US history, while tycoon Mr Trump hopes his pledge to “Make America Great Again” will win over voters in key swing states.

Republican Mr Trump, who has been dogged by allegations of misogyny and sexual misconduct, continued his tour of the country on Monday, targeting battleground states in an effort to get the 270 electoral college votes he needs to become one of the most unlikely victors of a presidential race.