British mother fears the worst after missing son said he would 'walk through typhoon'

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A mother is fearing the worst after the last contact with her son was when he said he was going to walk - through a typhoon.

Sara Ransom lost contact with her 22-year-old son Harry Jackson while he was trying to make his way to an evacuation centre in the Philippines, as the country was battered by a typhoon.

Typhoon Kammuri, known locally as Tisoy, has killed four people and hit the nation's most populous island Luzon at nearly 215 kilometres an hour on Monday, and Sara has not heard from her son ever since. Picture: SWNS

Typhoon Kammuri, known locally as Tisoy, has killed four people and hit the nation's most populous island Luzon at nearly 215 kilometres an hour on Monday, and Sara has not heard from her son ever since. Picture: SWNS

Typhoon Kammuri, known locally as Tisoy, has killed four people and hit the nation's most populous island Luzon at nearly 215 kilometres an hour on Monday, and Sara has not heard from her son ever since.

Harry was in the town of Daet, a small town on the east coast of the island.

He had gone to the Philippines on October 28 to help a friend set up a small farm and live there until July 2020.

Sara, an English teacher, said: "The last contact I had with him was after 11pm UK time on Monday, that would be after 7am. It was a video message.

Sara Ransom lost contact with her 22-year-old son Harry Jackson (left) while he was trying to make his way to an evacuation centre in the Philippines, as the country was battered by a typhoon. Picture: SWNS

Sara Ransom lost contact with her 22-year-old son Harry Jackson (left) while he was trying to make his way to an evacuation centre in the Philippines, as the country was battered by a typhoon. Picture: SWNS

"We message a lot, three or four times a week, over WhatsApp video calls.

"I spoke to him earlier, about midnight his time, and he was packing an emergency bag in case they needed to evacuate. His house is right by the river.

"There's a narrow road - the flood defences stood by his gate.

"Some parts of the roof of the outbuilding had gone from the farm. He said the flood had gone over three and a half metres.

"He said that' we have to get out and we have to walk to the evacuation centre about two kilometres.' "He said he had his boots on.

"And then the signal cut out and I haven't heard from him since."

The Foreign Commonwealth Office wanted Harry reported as missing due to the circumstances of the last call and his proximity to the flooding. Interpol has also been informed.

Sara, from Broadstairs, Kent, said: "We've been tracking all the media that we can and we know the power is out.

"Our hope is that he got to the evacuation centre safely but no one can confirm that.

"He said he was going to walk through a bloody typhoon."

Harry's eight-year-old brother Jude Feist has written a letter to Elf on the Shelf hoping Santa can find him.

It reads: "Elf please give this letter to Santa it's important! Tell Santa that can he find out if my brother's safe or not and if he's safe I won't have anything for Christmas.

"Send this letter to Santa without fail. I'm relying on you elf please don't let me down."

Sara said she is just "exceptionally worried" and "sick with dread".

She said: "I'm sure he's safe. He's got to be. But we don't know for sure.

"Nobody's seen him. He's really well liked over there because he's so nice, he likes people and people like him.

"People will know him. He goes surfing with Filipino friends. He was invited to the funeral of a local dignitary last week. He's so nice."

Sara, who has only slept two hours, is hoping for any information about Harry.

She has been informed by the Philippines Red Cross that all satellite signals are down and there is no communication in or out of the town.

Harry wants to be a sound engineer and would love to run a music festival one day, according to his worried mum.

Sara said: "He took all his tech equipment and set up a studio for the town.

"He got in contact with the local college and he was going to teach them basic sound recording for anyone who wanted to learn.

"He's fantastic with kids. He helps Jude with his homework.

"We chat every three to four days. He'll give me a quick call or show me a sunrise.

"We just talk about anything he's doing. I do the normal mum thing like tell him to wash his pants. He's just nice, he's just normal."