Customer service, Brexit, queue-jumpers and the weather – Britain’s top moans

People staring at their mobile instead of watching where they are going is high in the list of our pet hates, which includes poor wi-fi, spam emails and the weather. Picture: contributed
People staring at their mobile instead of watching where they are going is high in the list of our pet hates, which includes poor wi-fi, spam emails and the weather. Picture: contributed
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Forgetting to take bags to the supermarket, endless Brexit negotiations and people staring at their mobile instead of watching where they are going feature on a list of Britain’s favourite moans.

A poll of 2,000 adults found the top 50 list of day-to-day grumbles also includes poor wi-fi connection, supermarket self-service tills and “being overworked”.

These kinds of inconveniences are so minor compared to the problems faced by many people and animals in the world’s poorest communities

GEOFFREY DENNIS

Not being able to get a doctor’s appointment, endless spam emails and the terrible British weather are also on the list.

Smaller inconveniences such as waking up with bad hair, forgetting to buy milk and someone treading mud into your carpet are included.

The research also showed that Brits will admit to moaning three times a day on average about such things as bad customer service, receiving cold calls and pesky queue- jumpers.

One in six said they are most likely to whinge in the mornings, with traffic during their commute cited as a top complaint. One third think they moan less at the weekend.

Geoffrey Dennis, of the Society for the Protection of Animals Abroad, which carried out the poll, said: “Most people in the UK acknowledge that they complain about trivial matters on a regular basis.

“When we’re used to modern conveniences like wi-fi, home deliveries and air conditioning, it can be easy to forget that others have to deal with far greater problems every day.

“For people in Britain, everyday problems can seem like the end of the world – and most of us are guilty of complaining about things like bad weather, traffic or people pushing to the front of queues.”

The study also found millions prefer to moan in private, with 45 per cent waiting until they’re in the comfort of their own home before they let off steam.

One in five thinks the stereotype of moaning Brits makes us seem miserable; while a third find it entertaining.

Despite being a nation of moaners, one-fifth tend to block out others who moan about their “first world problems”.

Around four in ten respondents said they whine more now that they are adults, with half confessing they feel better after getting things off their chest.

More than half agree there are far more many moaners today than there used to be.

Brits can’t make up their mind when it comes to the weather – half of adults polled said they moan when its rainy and cold; one third complain when it’s too hot. And there’s no battle of the sexes when it comes to whinging, as people concur that men and women moan an equal amount.

The biggest mood-changers include tiredness, being hungry and the weather, with current relationships, exercise and hormones cited as considerable factors.

But sometimes moaning works – four in ten boast they have received money off their restaurant bill after complaining. One in four people believe that if they moan enough about the price of things, such as homes, bus tickets and meals, then something will eventually be done about it.

On the bright side, almost half of people polled reckon they could go the whole day without complaining.

Mr Dennis added: “These kinds of inconveniences are so minor compared to the problems faced by many people and animals in the world’s poorest communities”.