Trump’s Aberdeenshire golf resort ‘could face severe flooding’

Concerns have been raised that Mr Trumps course, once described by the US president as the best in the world, could be flooded from the north. Picture: SWNS
Concerns have been raised that Mr Trumps course, once described by the US president as the best in the world, could be flooded from the north. Picture: SWNS
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DONALD Trump’s five-star golf resort in Aberdeenshire may have to be shored up against the ravages of climate change and coastal erosion, a Scottish Government report has found.

The Trump International Golf Links are among several courses that were highlighted as being under threat in the Dynamic Coast: Scotland’s National Coastal Change Assessment study, published in August.

Other sites at risk include Montrose Golf Links, according to the study.

Mr Trump pulled the United States out of the Paris climate agreement in June and has speculated that climate change caused by people might be a “hoax” made up by the Chinese.

The report, details of which were published in the Sunday Times, said that despite warnings of erosion before the Trump course at Balmedie was built, the impact had twice damaged the third green since it opened five years ago.

The study said that had led to 200m of boulders being built as protection.

The study added: “Small pockets of erosion are anticipated along the dune edge of the planned Trump golf course extension south from Menie.

“If this materialises then there may be a need for defences in the future.”

However, other courses have also been affected, with the Royal Aberdeen, Murchar Golf course and Blackdog links around Aberdeen hit over the last 40 years.

• READ MORE: Losses at Trump’s Scottish golf resorts have doubled

The Dynamic Coast project used coastline data from the Ordnance Survey dating back to the 1890s to make predictions for the next 30 years.

It found that at least £340 million of coastal assets, such as buildings, roads and railways, are at risk by 2050 if recent erosion continues.

However, this compares to more than £13 billion of assets protected by beaches and dunes, and £5bn by built defences.